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Charity CEO Picked to Head Minn. Transit Board

Wednesday, December 29, 2010 - 07:35 PM

Susan Haigh, has been picked as the new leader for the board that runs the Twin Cities transit system. has been picked by Gov.-elect Mark Dayton as the new leader for the board that runs the Twin Cities transit system. (MPR Photo / Dan Olson)

(St Paul, Minn--Tim Pugmire, Dan Olson, MPR) Minnesota Governor-elect Mark Dayton filled a key transportation cabinet post Wednesday with his selection of Susan Haigh as Metropolitan Council chair. Metropolitan Council is the board that runs the Twin Cities transit system.

Haigh is currently CEO of Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity, where she said she plans to continue her work. She also served 10 years as a Ramsey County Commissioner and 12 years as a chief deputy county attorney. In a news release, Dayton called Haigh a "proven leader and consensus-builder."

The governor appoints the 17 member Met Council which oversees the work of 3,700 employees and an annual budget of about $780 million.

The Met Council is the regional planning agency for the seven counties that make up the Twin Cities metropolitan area. It also operates the regional systems for mass transit and waste water treatment.

Haigh said she regards the chair position as part time.

"Statutorily it is and so I'm looking forward to bringing my skills, that I've developed over many years in my career, as a consensus builder and as a collaborator and as someone who really listens to and understands local government to this work," she said.

Haigh will succeed Peter Bell, who led the Met Council for eight years under Gov. Tim Pawlenty.

Dayton will be sworn in as governor on Monday, but so far he's filled just four of about two-dozen cabinet posts.

Original article at MPR.

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