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PHOTOS: Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

Tuesday, October 30, 2012 - 10:19 AM

We’ll be updating this throughout the day. Send your photos to transponation@gmail.com or @transportnation.  ‘Cause we’d like to share them.

1:3opm: broken traffic light at King Street and Varick Street in lower Manhattan (photo by Kate Hinds)

10:27: from Jim O'Grady: "World Trade Center. Cop said PATH station flooded, didn't know how badly. My guess: badly."

10:11am: A beheaded subway entrance. (photo by Jim O'Grady)

10:11am: Staten Island Railway's Clifton Shop in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. (Photo by MTA via flickr)

9:55am: flooding at the entrance to the Hugh L. Carey (formerly Brooklyn Battery) Tunnel, via @NYGovCuomo

9:49am: Downed tree in Tribeca park (photo by Jim O'Grady)

8:14am: Rainbows over Brooklyn (photo by Andrea Bernstein)

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Comments [2]

Anastasie

Vicious ocean storms are nothing new. Look into the Grote Mandrenke which reshaped the coastline of Western Europe and killed tens of thousands. If that exact storm replayed now, it would be taken as evidence of "climate change," but what it would really evidence is a chaotic, nonlinear system that kicks out an unbelievably strong storm from time to time. The U.S. is currently experiencing the longest stretch of days between major landfalling hurricanes. The last one to strike U.S. shores was Wilma, in 2005.

Oct. 31 2012 04:50 PM
Joshua Gordon

Photo you've captioned "9:55am: flooding at the entrance to the Hugh L. Carey (formerly Brooklyn Battery) Tunnel, via @NYGovCuomo" is actually the entrance to the Battery Park Underpass, but just as badly flooded. Here's the Carey tunnel entrance getting flooded: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=50134146n&tag=strip

Oct. 30 2012 04:41 PM

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