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NYC Getting More Audible Crosswalk Signals To Help Visually Impaired

Thursday, September 29, 2011 - 02:35 PM

An accessible pedestrian crosswalk control panel (photo by William Alatriste/NY City Council via Flickr)

New York City is ramping up installation of accessible pedestrian crosswalk signals.

On Wednesday, the city showed off its newest APS at the intersection of Seventh Avenue and West 23rd Street. Twenty-one intersections across the city have been equipped with the audible signal devices since 2004. But the city said it's going to be putting them in at a significantly faster rate, with plans for 25 more in the next 12 months.

Janette Sadik-Khan, New York City Department of Transportation commissioner, said the audible signals "are literally sound investments that will help improve the safety and quality of life for the most vulnerable New Yorkers who use our streets."

According to DOT information, APSs are wired to a pedestrian signal and can send audible messages to indicate when it is safe to cross. (The button that initiates the sound emits a clicking noise so it can be found by pedestrians.) The units also vibrate to help those with hearing impairments.

Using the new signal, at the intersection of 23rd Street and 7th Avenue in Manhattan (photo by William Alatriste/NY City Council via Flickr)

You can read more about the program -- as well as find out where the next audible signals are being installed -- here.

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