Streams

New York State Makes It Easier for Vets to Get Commercial Drivers Licenses

Thursday, February 09, 2012 - 04:14 PM

(photo by Kate Hinds)

New York State is changing commercial drivers license regulations to make it easier for veterans to get jobs.

The state will waive road tests for veterans applying for a commercial driver's license if they have military experience operating a similar vehicle, the state announced.

The waiver is now available for up to 90 days after discharge or for active duty military and active duty New York National Guard members that currently hold a valid driver license.

Applicants must be regularly employed, or have been regularly employed, within the last 90 days in a military position requiring operation of a commercial motor vehicle, and also have operated a vehicle that is similar to a civilian commercial vehicle for at least two years immediately preceding discharge from the military. Applicants must also certify that they have not had their license suspended, revoked, cancelled or denied in the last four years.

Applicants must fill out a "CDL Certification for Military Waiver of Skills Test" form (CDL-102) which is available at any DMV office or online here.

 

Tags:

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Comments [1]

miltech

Ive tried that and certain dmv locations are not honoring that regulation. I have driven multiple commercial vehicles for the military, to include school buses, and yet I am still having problems obtaining job required endorsements. whats the deal nyc?

Feb. 03 2013 02:47 PM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.

Sponsored