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Chicago Wants to Zero Out Traffic Fatalities By 2022

Friday, May 11, 2012 - 09:03 AM

New York's transportation department has had safety bragging rights -- reducing traffic fatalities to their lowest level ever.

But Chicago wants to go one better.  In a sweeping action agenda (.pdf), Chicago's DOT Chief, Gabe Klein, is promising to eliminate all traffic fatalities within a decade, and to reduce bike and pedestrian injuries by 50%.

Klein says this can be done through improved design, more vigorous enforcement, and safety education.  Among the proposals are a 20 mph speed limit in residential neighborhoods and more clearly marked crosswalks.

The document also promised to increase the number of under 5-mile trips taken by bike to 5% of all trips, and to "make Chicago the best big city in America for cycling and walking."

That's a distinction NYC DOT Chief Janette Sadik-Khan and Mayor Michael Bloomberg have tried to claim for New York, which has added hundreds of miles of bikeways in the last five years, and tripled the number of cyclists.

The Chicago document also promises more transit options including BRT, better on-time performance by the CTA, and more real time transit information.

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Comments [1]

Matthias

I hadn't realized that Klein went from DC to Chicago. They will surely benefit from his experience. Chicago was voted the most bike-friendly city in the US some years ago, but of course there is still room for improvement. An increase in cycling and walking always reduces traffic fatalities.

May. 14 2012 12:21 PM

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