Streams

TN Moving Stories: Feds Tell California It Can't Change Bullet Train Route, and NY Pol Wants Delivery Bike License Plates

Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 08:54 AM

The DOT told California that it can't postpone the deadline to start construction of that state's $43 billion bullet train project --  or make changes to the route. (Los Angeles Times)

NYC's bus ridership is down, subway ridership is up; MTA says traffic congestion may be partially to blame. (Wall Street Journal)

Any officer suspected of ticket-fixing in the Bronx is being asked about it on the stand -- whether it's on a related case or not. (New York Times)

The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee will hold a hearing today on how to boost rail service in the Northeast Corridor through private investment. (The Hill)

Jalopnik reports that one Austin resident found a baby owl perched on his bicycle tire.

Here's a good excuse for being late to work (photo by Adam Norwood via Jalopnik)

A New York City Councilman wants delivery bikes to have license plates. (NY Daily News)

KPCC chronicles efforts to make Beverly Hills bicycle-friendly.

Good writes that Texas is spending $4.4 billion to widen a 28-mile highway at the same time it's preparing to lay off 100,000 teachers.

Vancouver says it's on track to reach its goal of 45% of all trips into town being made by bike, foot or transit by 2020. (Vancouver Sun)

Follow Transportation Nation on Twitter.

In case you missed it on Transportation Nation:

-- thinking about taking your bike on a NY-area commuter rail this holiday weekend? Think again. (link)

-- as gas prices go up, so does ride sharing and transit use (link). And car sales go down (link).

-- the feds unveiled new fuel economy stickers (link)

-- the NY MTA's new website highlights transit apps (link)

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