Streams

Why One San Francisco Bike Lane Design Is Upsetting Drivers and Cyclists (AUDIO)

Friday, January 25, 2013 - 03:40 PM

JFK Boulevard, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco. (Photo Courtesy of SFMTA Livable Streets)

A prominent bike lane in San Francisco may be suffering because of its unique design. The ambitious, and expensive, bike lane striping of Golden Gate Park stands out from the other projects of San Francisco's bike plan for the criticism it draws from cyclists and drivers alike, in part for a disorienting placement of line of parked cars.

“I think it’s one of the dumbest things I ever saw that they put these stripes down here,” says driver Jimmy Harris of the lanes, pictured above.

Average speeds of drivers and bike riders have both fallen, a success at what's known as traffic calming. But also a stark test case of transportation psychology as users cite narrow lanes and an unusual arrangement of parked cars as confusing.

Ben Trefny and Rai Sue Sussman took a ride along JFK Blvd, with a measuring tape, to see why these particular stripes are raising hackles of bike riders and drivers. Give the audio version a listen.

Here's more: 

For a bit of background, the streets of San Francisco are changing. There are separated bike lanes on Market Street. There’s green paint all over the much-used bike path called the Wiggle. The city is definitely becoming more bicycle-friendly.

After many delays, the city’s bike plan is taking effect, with streets long-designed for car traffic being reconfigured for other modes of transportation. Four years ago San Francisco had 45 miles of bike lanes. Today there are 65 and with more on the way. Plus, 75 more miles of streets will be stenciled with symbols designating them as bike-friendly routes. It’s all having a big impact.

According to the San Francisco Bike Coalition, bike trips have increased more than 70 percent since 2006. But the planners’ choices for JFK Blvd. havn't been implemented so smoothly – and it’s flat-out rankled many of the bicyclists it’s supposed to serve.

The wide JFK Blvd. used to have almost no stripes whatsoever. Now, it’s full of them, creating several chutes designated for different purposes:  there’s a bike lane at either the edge; then buffer zone; a lane for parking; and then in the center a car lane in each direction.

Last spring, we talked with Leah Shahum, executive director of the San Francisco Bike Coalition, about that project: the striping of Golden Gate Park

“Imagine the parking lanes that are kind of being moved out more into the center of the street, and the bikeway – the dedicated bikeway – will be against the curb, or against the green space, or the sidewalk area,” she said. “So that people biking actually have that physical separation from the moving traffic. JFK we think is a good street to try this because it is a very wide street it's way wider than most streets in San Francisco, so there was room there to try something different.”

It cost at least $425,000 to lay the stripes down – and the MTA estimates more than that to plan it all out.

So, what do the people who travel along JFK think about the new configuration?

“From a drivers’ standpoint, it’s pretty bad,” adds Daly City’s Nick Shurmeyetiv. “Honestly, the first few times I came in – like the first few times it really threw me off. I wasn't sure what was going on. I thought it was a traffic jam, or I don't know what,” he said of the parked cars that appeared to be a lane of traffic.

Frank Jones, from Concord says, “Well, we did pull up and stop behind somebody. And we thought, ‘They're not moving.’ Then we realized – there was nobody in the car! So we went around them.”

A count of cars lined up in the designated parking lane across from the De Young Museum one Friday afternoon showed 11 of 46 vehicles at least partially in the buffer zone. They followed a pattern: typically, each vehicle was aligned with the one in front of it. So if one missed the mark, many more would do the same. And they never missed on the side with car traffic. Only on the side toward the bikes.

“Yeah, you know the roadway, the width is a little narrower, but for the most part, this isn't a place to be going really fast from A to B,” says Peter Brown, who works as an SFMTA project manager.

If it’s the SFMTA’s goal to slow traffic on JFK, it’s been successful.

For cars, average speed has dropped about two or three miles per hour since the road was striped, according to a preliminary report. It makes sense, as the thoroughfare is much more narrow, now, and cars have to fully stop if anyone in front of them is trying to park.

Average bike speeds have also dropped, from an average of 14-and-a-half miles per hour to less than 13 during the week and a little slower on weekends. The report suggests that’s because bicyclists who used to cruise really fast up or down Golden Gate Park now have to slow down for other cyclists and the people who are trying to get across the bike lanes to their cars. Calming traffic, on paper anyway, arguably makes the route more accessible and safer.

The SFMTA surveyed people who use JFK both before and shortly after the new stripes went in. Almost 90 percent of responders felt like they understood the striping, but only about 60 percent liked it. Some people, like Lita Ward, don’t.

“I've had several incidents where I've nearly collided with people getting out of their cars, that are crossing the bike lane into the sidewalk area,” says Ward. “Obviously, we can't stop quickly enough... I think it's a great concept, but drivers need to be aware of what that change means for bicyclists."

It didn’t take long, wandering around JFK to see that scenario unfold. Just west of the De Young, two teenagers on mountain bikes blew through a stop sign on the downhill slope. A pedestrian crossing the bike lane to get to his car had to jump out of the way as they rapidly approached. The kids obviously hadn’t anticipated his presence, and the pedestrian didn’t notice until it was nearly too late.

Some people think better signage and public awareness campaigning would solve some of the ongoing issues with the newly striped lanes of Golden Gate Park, including longtime bike activist Chris Carlsson, who runs Shaping San Francisco, which looks into ways to improve the city.

“A proper educational campaign, in conjunction with an infrastructural transformation, I think could be really successful,” says Carlsson, who is one of the founders of Critical Mass.

[Related: Listen to an oral history of how Critical Mass was founded]

The people who most advocated for – and implemented – the striping of Golden Gate Park are examining the effects. The SF Bike Coalition has a webpage devoted to the “JFK Separated Bikeway Project.”

The page addresses some of the problems: cars that aren’t parked where they’re supposed to be; people crossing the bikeway without looking. SFMTA has a page called the JFK Cycletrack. It includes a survey in which people can share their thoughts about what they like and don’t like.

Even with the imposed structure, people are making the new configuration work for them. Sporty bicyclists take the car lane (which is allowed) to avoid slower-biking tourists and families; pedestrians walk in the bike path to avoid sprinklers; and cars drive through like they did before – only slightly slower.

But more than six months in, because of ongoing parking issues and -- for San Francisco -- the unusual off-curb parking situation, it appears that the striping of Golden Gate Park is not working quite as it was originally imagined. The removal of more than 80 parking spaces alone will be enough to change usage of the road. And unless a large-scale redesign is implemented, an experiment in shared road design may simply require users to get used to a number of imperfections.

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Comments [7]

Duane from San Francisco

Nothing like taking what used to be a non-issue and turning it in to one. This is so typical of the new Suburb that is San Francisco. Diane Finstine had a saying....If it ain't broke, don't fix it. The new saying in San Francisco is...If it is working it needs to be broken. As long as MTA and DPT share the same bed, there will be no end to the insanity of what this city is becoming. MTA will NEVER have a balanced budget....and why should they when they can just raise the price of parking tickets to cover their wastes? As for the new bike lanes and parking in GGP, if you have little kids it is terrifying and only a matter of time before someone gets hurt and sues the city (and rightfully so). I predict that once the paint fades on the street, so will this stupid idea.

May. 18 2013 08:57 PM
sfparkripoff

City Halls new bicycle lanes have drawn overwhelming criticism from residents who say they are dangerous, poorly designed, and hazardous to use. Specifically, the sharrows which are in the middle of busy streets are dangerous to use.

The new bicycle lanes are preventing faster moving vehicles, including MUNI busses and trains from moving at their maximum speed and adhering to their schedule. The end result is slower traffic, and increased street congestion.

SFMTA and the Bicycle coalition numbers say that almost all the bike riders are white, single, males between the ages of 21 and 30. 90% of bike riding occurs on weekends and is for recreation, not commuting. Of those who commute by bike, 80% ride to public transit, not all the way to work. Bike ridership drops considerably during winter and when it rains. Even the highest estimates of the number of bike commuters puts them at less than 3% of the commuting population.

So, what is the endgame? Is City Hall trying to make transit faster for Muni vehicles, or slower for recreational cyclists?

Feb. 03 2013 01:48 AM
Matthias

Just a note: on a mixed-traffic street, there is no such thing as a "car lane". Bicycles, motorcycles, cars, trucks and buses are all permitted to use a traffic lane.

A separated cycle track is an excellent way to encourage people who are intimidated by riding in mixed traffic to get out and use the street. However, faster cyclists may prefer to ride in mixed traffic and they are certainly well within their rights to do so.

Judging from the photo above, there is nothing other than a white line to demarcate the parking lane, so drivers' confusion is understandable. Perhaps hatch-lines dividing parking spaces would be helpful.

Jan. 29 2013 09:11 AM
Tom

Hell is other people and what they do and what they say, right?

Jan. 28 2013 12:50 PM
You Idiots

what a dumb story. narrow lanes induce drivers to drive slower. I ride through here all the time. it's great.

Jan. 27 2013 08:16 PM
John S. Allen

Sebra leaves says, "[W]hat is the point of having bike lanes that the bikes do not have to use?"

It appears that she would like to prohibit bicyclists from what she inaccurately calls "car lanes", so, let me paraphrase: "What is the point of having special schools for blacks that they are not required to attend?"

Bikes don't make decisions about where to ride. I would rather be described correctly as a bicyclist, thank you -- just as African Americans would rather enjoy the dignity of being described as such, rather than as "blacks", and would rather not be forced to attend inferior schools.

Travel at speeds achieved by faster bicyclists, and downhill, approaches or equals that by motorists. It is not safe between the curb and the parking lane, as the article describes, and often not even possible, due to other, slower bicyclists. The appeal of bicycling as transportation is not increased by slowing bicyclists.

And, as to legality: these are not bike lanes. They officially fall into the category of separate path. There is no law requiring bicyclists to use them.

Integrated, rather than segregated, use of the roadway -- with some traffic calming to slow *motorists* -- after all, this is a *park* -- would be more satisfactory.

Jan. 26 2013 05:42 PM
Peter

"I am particularly concerned that the bikes are allowed into the car lanes but the cars are not allowed in the bike lanes."

"What is the point in having bike lanes that the bikes do not have to use?"

The above quotes illustrate a rarely enunciated problem with bike lanes: They reinforce the view that bicycles are not legitimate vehicles and contribute to the sense of entitlement displayed by the commenter.

Unfortunately many who hold such views express themselves by physically intimidating cyclists with their motor vehicles.

Jan. 26 2013 05:38 PM

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