Streams

Central Park Cycling Ticket Blitz: The Lights Are Changing

Thursday, April 07, 2011 - 05:22 PM

(Alex Goldmark, Transportation Nation) Here's what the NYC DOT says about rumors of a change to the traffic signals in Central Park:

"The current light synchronization for 25 mph is not a new timing plan. DOT adjusted the timing for several signals on March 26 on Central Park's drives after an inspection determined that some had fallen out of synch."

Tweaking traffic signal synchronization may not seem like hot news, but it could be a partial solution to the increasingly heated brouhaha over ticketing cyclists in Central Park for running red lights and for one day, speeding. If the lights are synched, then there will be fewer reds to run.

This morning New York Cycle Club's President Ellen Jaffe posted that she had news of the signal synchronization and that there may be other changes afoot in policing of red light running in the park. Transportation Nation is still trying to confirm that with NYPD. We'll update you if we learn anything.

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Comments [1]

Steve

How does retiming the lights to a 25 mph synch, even if it was done before, help all but the most hardcore cyclists? Few people can sustain a 25 or 26 mph average speed in order to make each light. Going 15 mph which is still fast for a lot of people, you're going to hit a lot of lights even if they brought the synch down to 20 mph. I think this "solution" came about because the mayor and the NYPD finally ticked off i-bankers and corporate lawyers who train in the park. Harassment of cyclists commuting to work still continues.

Apr. 07 2011 05:39 PM

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