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Foreclosure Settlement, John Lurie, Nathaniel Rich's Novel, Sequencing the Human Genome

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Monday, April 15, 2013

DNA molecule display (Christian Guthier/flickr)

ProPublica’s Paul Kiel explains how the government plans to compensate the 3.9 million homeowners who were victims of aggressive foreclosure policies. John Lurie discusses his career in television, film, art, and, of course, music. Nathaniel Rich talks about his new novel, Odds Against Tomorrow. And yesterday marked the tenth anniversary of the first complete mapping of the human genome, and we’ll talk to bioethicist Robert Klitzman about how the human genome sequence has changed medicine.

Details of the Government Foreclosure Deal

As the government's largest effort to compensate victims of the banks' foreclosure practices comes to a close, ProPublica's Paul Kiel reports that it won't be much of an ending: roughly 3 million borrowers will receive no more than $500. He goes into the history of robo-signing and other aggressive practices that caused homeowners who weren’t behind on their mortgage payments to face foreclosure. His latest article is "For Most Homeowners, Gov’t Foreclosure Deal Brings A Few Hundred Bucks."

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Fishing with John Lurie

Musician, actor, filmmaker, and artist John Lurie discusses his short-lived TV series, "Fishing with John," which he conceived, starred in, and directed.  He’ll also talk about his painting, a decade-long battle with Lyme disease and the controversial profile of him published in The New Yorker in 2010.

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Nathaniel Rich on Odds Against Tomorrow

Nathaniel Rich talks about his new novel, Odds Against Tomorrow. It’s set in New York City in the near future and follows Mitchell Zukor, a gifted young mathematician hired by a mysterious new financial consulting firm, FutureWorld, to calculate worst-case scenarios in intricate detail.

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The Human Genome Project: Ten Years Later

April 14th marked the tenth anniversary of the first complete mapping of the human genome. Dr. Robert Klitzman, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and the Director of the Masters of Bioethics Program at Columbia University and author of Am I My Genes?, talks about how human genome sequencing has changed medicine and bioethics.

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Guest Picks: John Lurie

Actor, filmmaker, musician, and soon-to-be writer John Lurie was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently and he shared a few of his favorite things. Just a few, though, because he loves everything...

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