Streams

Springtime Foraging

Friday, March 29, 2013

Tama Matsuoka Wong discusses foraging in spring and what you can pick in the wild to use in your kitchen. She’s the author of Foraged Flavor: Finding Fabulous Ingredients in Your Backyard or Farmer's Market, with 88 Recipes.

Guests:

Tama Matsuoka Wong

Comments [4]

Apropos foraging, a quote I heard (probably on NPR):

"There are /bold/ mushroom-pickers and there are /old/ mushroom-pickers. But there are not /old/, /bold/ mushroom-pickers."

Mar. 29 2013 01:21 PM
ANONYME

HEY WHY CAN'T WE LISTEN TO ONE SHOW (FOOD FRIDSYS) INSTEAD OF SOUHDCHECK??? NOBODY AT WNYC SEEMS TO GIVE A S---!

Mar. 29 2013 01:20 PM
Ken from NJ

I wish more farmers and home gardeners would grow plants that are foraged. Please note ramps becoming threatened because of harvest (festival in West Virginia).
I love that Tama is talking mostly about invasive weeds.

Mar. 29 2013 01:13 PM
Chris Garvey

The biggest food news today is the rapid stealth passage of the the "Monsanto Protection Act", a provision of the HR 933 spending bill that was passed by Congress this month and signed into law Tuesday by President Barack Obama.
See: http://www.ibtimes.com/monsanto-protection-act-roll-call-how-did-your-congressperson-vote-hr-933-1158789#

The language in Section 735 effectively bars federal courts from being able to halt the sale or planting of genetically modified crops and seeds, no matter what health consequences from their consumption may come to light in the future, according to interpretations of the law included in a petition against the provision that was circulated by the advocacy group Food Democracy Now.

"This provision is simply an industry ploy to continue to sell genetically engineered seeds even when a court of law has found they were approved by USDA illegally," the petition stated. "It is unnecessary and an unprecedented attack on U.S. judicial review. Congress should not be meddling with the judicial review process based solely on the special interest of a handful of companies. Many food safety advocates maintain that there have not been enough studies into the potential health risks of GMO and GE seeds and crops, and the judicial power to stop companies from selling or planting them was one key recourse they were relying on to stop them from being sold if health risks come to light."

Mar. 29 2013 10:26 AM

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