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Old Lever Machine Becomes New Voting Kiosk

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

WNYC

What’s big, orange and looks like an old lever voting machine? It’s a new voter kiosk unveiled for the first time Tuesday by staff at the New York City Board of Elections, who say deploying them citywide would shorten lines at polls and speed the process of communicating results on election night.

After coming under fire for its performance in recent elections, the board staff has been trying to find some creative solutions to address complaints from voters and elected officials.

John Naudus, the board’s director of electronic voting systems, presented the $10,000 kiosk prototype, which uses the hull of an old lever voting machine, with the lever removed and replaced by a 72-inch touch screen monitor, camera and printer.

“Someone will notice this walking away,” said Naudus. “Whereas if we put a laptop out there, one of our concerns is always it will grow legs and walk away.”

Before polls open, poll workers will be able to check in for duty and print out a confirmation slip. In theory, this would enable the board to deploy additional poll workers to any sites where there might be a shortage.

Throughout Election Day voters would be able to use the kiosk to check poll site information. A person would type their address on the large touch screen monitor. If the person was in the wrong location, the kiosk would print directions to the right one. If the voter was at the right poll site, the kiosk would tell them which table corresponds with their election district.

At the end of the night, poll workers would be able to use the kiosk to upload election results as opposed to working with NYPD officers to transport election information on memory sticks.

“The sticks won’t have to travel all the way to the precincts,” explained Naudus. “They'll just travel across the room.”

He said if all goes well, election results should start coming in by 10:30 p.m. on a busy election night, as opposed to 3 or 4 a.m.

The board hopes to build out 2,500 kiosks so there could be two at every poll site in the city. But before that build out can happen, the board needs funding from the City Council. That means at the earliest, the kiosks would be deployed for the elections in 2014.

The board is scheduled to testify before the City Council on Thursday for its preliminary budget hearing.

Editors:

Julianne Welby

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Comments [10]

ARthur from New York

Try this voting lever machine
http://v.theonion.com/onionmedia/videos/videometa/1615/zen_mp4.mp4

Florida To Experiment With New 600-Lever Voting Machines | Video | The Onion - America's Finest News Source

May. 07 2013 11:53 AM
Linda gibbs from New York

What is wrong with the new electronic touchscreen voting machine produced by VotRite LLC
www.votrite.com

May. 06 2013 02:11 PM
Linda gibbs from New York

What is wrong with the new electronic touchscreen voting machine produced by VotRite LLC
www.votrite.com

May. 06 2013 02:11 PM
Linda gibbs from New York

What is wrong with the new electronic touchscreen voting machine produced by VotRite LLC
www.votrite.com

May. 06 2013 02:11 PM
Linda gibbs from New York

What is wrong with the new electronic touchscreen voting machine produced by VotRite LLC
www.votrite.com

May. 06 2013 02:11 PM
Linda gibbs from New York

What is wrong with the new electronic touchscreen voting machine produced by VotRite LLC
www.votrite.com

May. 06 2013 02:11 PM
Linda gibbs from New York

What is wrong with the new electronic touchscreen voting machine produced by VotRite LLC
www.votrite.com

May. 06 2013 02:11 PM
Linda gibbs from New York

What is wrong with the new electronic touchscreen voting machine produced by VotRite LLC
www.votrite.com

May. 06 2013 02:11 PM
Pete from Harlem, NYC

Having taken a closer look at the photo, unless Mr. Naudus is a towering giant, the screen is probably closer to 42 inches than to 72. Still overkill for the application, even if the application were something worthwhile.

And if I'm reading this correctly, they want to destroy the old voting machines in order to use them as glorified Kensington locks? Has the BOE studied the alternative of auctioning them off or selling them on eBay over some period of time? I'm sure there are plenty of collectors out there -- as well as some municipalities that might want to use a voting system that actually makes sense!

Mar. 13 2013 08:08 PM
Pete from Harlem, NYC

This is absurd. And I say this as someone who waited in line for about 3 hours at an uptown polling site back in November. There were quite a lot of shortcomings in evidence then which truly do require improvement -- but none of them will be helped by this kiosk.

First and foremost was the fact that the poll workers were completely and utterly inept. Those who attempted to address the lines just made matters worse. And the physical layout organization of the polling site was woefully inadequate.

BOE: Want to fix your mess? Create a system that allows voters to walk into any polling site, walk up to any table, and receive the correct ballot. That means you need a real voter database, and a two-way electronic system that allows poll workers to check off any voter who receives a ballot. That is your bottleneck, and *that* is where you need to add the tech.

What you don't need is to throw in giant information kiosks and to further confuse matters in an effort to bypass inept poll workers and/or inform voters about election district minutiae that they shouldn't have to be aware of in the first place!

And, seriously... 72-inch touch screens! Seriously?!

Mar. 13 2013 07:58 PM

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