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Episode #29

Gabfest Radio: The Old-School Filibuster Edition

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Saturday, March 09, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists John Dickerson, David Plotz, and special guest Dave Weigel discuss President Obama’s renewed efforts to schmooze GOP lawmakers in order to resolve contentious budget issues, and Sen. Rand Paul's 12-hour filibuster on US drone policy.

Then on the Culture Gabfest portion of the show, regular panelist Dana Stevens and special guests and David Haglund and Forrest Wickman are joined by writer Mark Harris to discuss his GQ article about the shifting path to stardom for Hollywood’s leading men, which demands a delicate balance of mainstream likability and edgy self-awareness. They then consider Amanda Palmer’s TED talk about “the art of asking” and the evolving relationship between generative artists and the fans who fund their work. Finally, the Gabfesters discuss the PBS miniseries Makers: Women Who Make America, what it reveals about the strides of feminism over the past half-century, and the topics and themes the documentary seems to avoid.

Join the Gabfest discussion all week long at the Political Gabfest Facebook page and the Culture Gabfest Facebook page.

Here are links to some of the items mentioned in this week’s episode: 

POLITICAL GABFEST (Click here for this week’s individual episode at Slate):

John recaps the president’s history of reaching out to Republican senators.

Rand Paul has energized the right’s anti-drone activism by invoking fears about threats to freedom.

CULTURE GABFEST (Click here for this week’s individual episode at Slate):

Mark Harris for GQ on “the new and improved leading man.”

Bradley Cooper speaking French in an interview for The Hangover Part II.

The movies John Carter, Battleship, The Vow, 21 Jump Street, Ocean’s Eleven, The Social Network, J. Edgar, Mirror Mirror, and The Normal Heart. 

The TED talk “Amanda Palmer: The Art of Asking.“ 

Amanda Palmer’s Kickstarter project, which asked for $100,000 and raised $1.2 million. 

Amanda Palmer’s Accidental Experiment with With Real Communism” by Joshua Clover for The New Yorker online. 

Cord Jefferson for Gawker on Amanda Palmer and accountability on Kickstarter.

Slate’s own John Dickerson writing for his personal blog on Amanda Palmer’s TED talk.

The Dresden Dolls and Grand Theft Orchestra.

Björk's failed Kickstarter project.

In Rainbows, Radiohead’s pioneering pay-what-you-want album.

The musician Mark Eitzel, who makes great music but not much money.

Kathrine Switzer running the 1967 Boston Marathon as race organizer Jock Semple tried to take away her bib.

Eyes on the Prize, the 1987 documentary about the civil rights era.

The 2009 documentary Sweetgrass.

Endorsements

Forrest’s pick: An all-time favorite song about gender roles: “Androgynous” by The Replacements.

David’s pick: The essay “The Dream (Girl) is Over” by Michelle Orange, from her book This is Running for Your Life: Essays. 

Dana’s pick: Marc Maron’s interview with Mike White (writer, director, and co-star of Enlightened) for Maron’s podcast, WTF With Marc Maron.

End Music: “Androgynous” by The Replacements

Hosted by:

Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, Stephen Metcalf, David Plotz, Dana Stevens and Julia Turner
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Comments [1]

Jessie Henshaw from Way Uptown

The disengagement is not because "the public is not angry enough", it's because we'er overwhelmed by the stupidity of the media and government;s absorption with their conflicting interests.

Mar. 09 2013 07:15 AM

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