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The Taliban vs. Teenage Girl, Richard Hell, The New Deal

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Monday, March 11, 2013

Malala Yousafzai Vanity Fair (From the April 2013 issue of Vanity Fair)

Vanity Fair’s Marie Brenner tells how a Pakistani girl became the face of resistance against the Taliban—and the target of gunfire. Richard Hell talks about starting pivotal punk bands like Television, the Heartbreakers, and Richard Hell and the Voidoids. Jonathan Dee describes his latest novel, A Thousand Pardons. Historian Ira Katznelson argues that a small group of Southern lawmakers protected American democracy during the 1930’s, even as they safeguarded racial segregation. 

Malala Yousafzai: The Target

Vanity Fair writer-at-large Marie Brenner discusses Malala Yousafzai, the 15-year-old girl from Mingora, Pakistan, who was recently shot for speaking out against the Taliban. In her article “The Target,” in the April issue of Vanity Fair, she tells how a girl from a remote village became a force for change as well as a focus for a number of complex agendas.

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Richard Hell: I Dreamed I Was a Very Clean Tramp

Writer and musician Richard Hell charts his childhood, coming of age, and misadventures as an artist in the era of rock and roll. I Dreamed I Was a Very Clean Tramp: An Autobiography is about his journey from the hinterlands into the city in search of art and passion when he was 17. He was a pivotal voice of the age of punk, starting such seminal bands as Television, the Heartbreakers, and Richard Hell and the Voidoids, and he help make CBGB a punk ground zero. 

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Jonathan Dee on His Novel, A Thousand Pardons

Jonathan Dee talks about his new novel, A Thousand Pardons. It’s a tale of self-invention and public scandal, that raises the question: what do we really want when we ask for forgiveness? 

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The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time

Ira Katznelson examines the pivotal New Deal era through a sweeping international lens that shows democracy struggling against enticing ideologies like Fascism and Communism. Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time argues that a small group of Southern lawmakers protected American democracy during the 1930s and 1940s, even as they safeguarded racial segregation. 

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