Streams

Flood Map Shows Sea Rise Down to Street Level

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

WNYC

Researchers at Rutgers University have created NJFloodMapper, an online tool that allows users to visualize coastal flooding hazards at various sea level rises.  The tool can help towns and counties visualize rising seal level and how they'd be impacted by it.  

NJFloodMapper allows users to simulate sea level rises of from one foot (the rise many scientists expect in the next 50 years) to six feet.

Researchers at Rutgers University have created NJFloodMapper, an online tool that allows users to visualize coastal flooding hazards at various sea level rises.  The tool can help towns and counties visualize rising seal level and how they'd be impacted by it.  NJFloodMapper allows users to simulate sea level rises of from one foot (the rise many scientists expect in the next 50 years) to six feet.

"Our objective here was to be able to allow the user to look at which areas would be vulneratble to sea level rise or other kinds of coastal inundation due to storm surge," said Rick Lathrop, professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources at Rutgers University.  He also directs the Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis at Rutgers University.  The team wanted end users, like land use planners, to be able to use the tool.


"We did a lot of focus groups and said, how would you like to see the data?  What kind of information do you need, rather than designing the tool up front and hoping that it met their needs," added Lathrop.

Rutgers also collaborated with the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve to create the tool, using data available from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA.

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