Streams

Episode #3132

Postminimal Piano

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Saturday, March 02, 2013

For this New Sounds, listen to some of the self-dubbed “ritual groove” of Pianist Nik Bärtsch's Ronin, a chamber jazz outfit who mix minimalism and James Brown liberally.  We’ll hear from the latest album “Llyria,” named after a luminous sea creature.

Also, sample from William Duckworth’s best-known work, Time Curve Preludes, a set of piano pieces written in 1979 and one of the first so-called "post-minimalist" compositions.  What the American Record Guide calls the “Well-Tempered Clavier of minimalism,” is one principal melody held in musical space by a durational architecture based on proportional time.  Although it might sound like music for mathematicians,  with its architecture making use of the Fibonacci series, the work contains hints of Satie, bluegrass banjo picking and the rocking fire of Jerry Lee Lewis.   Plus, a selection from the Australian long-form extended improvisatory trio the Necks, and their slowly unfolding music that develops through ambient sound washes, shifting rhythms and psychedelic mood swings.

PROGRAM #3132, Post-minimalist Piano (First aired on 11/01/2010)

ARTIST(S)

RECORDING

CUT(S)

SOURCE

James Blackshaw

The Glass Bead Game

Arc, excerpt [2:00]

Young God Records YG40 younggodrecords.com

William Duckworth / Neely Bruce

The Time Curve Preludes

One  [2:20]

Lovely Music #2031**
www.lovely.com*

Nik Bärtsch's Ronin

Llyria

Module 47 [8:02]

ECM 2178
www.ecmrecords.com

James Blackshaw

The Glass Bead Game

Arc [12:30]

Young God Records YG40 younggodrecords.com

William Duckworth / Neely Bruce

The Time Curve Preludes

Two2:20]

See above.

The Necks

The Boys (Soundtrack)

He Led Them Into the World [10:21]

ReR NECKS4
www.rermegacorp.com
www.thenecks.com

William Duckworth / Neely Bruce

The Time Curve Preludes

Twenty-Four [2:35]

See above.

Nik Bärtsch's Ronin

 

Modul 48 [6:56]

See above.

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