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An Economically Stimulating Debate

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Wednesday, January 16, 2008

What kind of stimulus does the economy need? Rudy Giuliani is proposing an immediate corporate tax cut, Democrats have other ideas, but the president and Congress want to do something now. Guests from Club for Growth and Economic Policy Institute debate the issue. Also, does the school day start too early?

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Moving on From Michigan

Dana Milbank, political columnist for the Washington Post and author of Homo Politicus: The Strange and Scary Tribes that Run Our Government, looks at how the Republicans fared in the Michigan primary.

Comments [16]

The View From the Ethnic Press: Arab-Americans

How do New York's Arab-Americans view the presidential election? Antoine Faisal, publisher of Aramica, examines the issues.

Comments [10]

"Rent" Cut

Michael Musto, columnist for The Village Voice and the author of La Dolce Musto: Writings by the World's Most Outrageous Columnist (Carroll & Graf, 2007) comments on what the 12-year lifespan of the musical Rent says about the city it depicts.

Comments [21]

An Economically Stimulating Debate

David Keating, executive director of Club for Growth, a political action group promoting small government and low taxes, and Josh Bivens, economist at the Economic Policy Institute, a progressive think tank, debate the need for, and the components of, an economic stimulus package.

Comments [11]

Later is Better

Are teenagers lazy? No, they're just not built to be alert early in the morning. Writer Nancy Kalish, co-author of The Case Against Homework: How Homework Is Hurting Our Children and What We Can Do About It, makes her case for starting the school day later.

Comments [21]

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