Streams

Performance Enhancement

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Is steroid use becoming commonplace in the rap world? Several stars have been implicated in an investigation into the use of performance-enhancing drugs more commonly associated with sports. Bomani Jones host of Sports Saturday on WRBZ-AM in Raleigh, NC and former music columnist for AOL Black Voices looks at the issue.

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Comments [13]

galvo

md , hgh impoves skin look, in most cases the press and media legistors lump hgh with steroids. steroids do not atrophy muscles, when they speak of steroids, they mean anabolic steroids ,not inflammatory steroids. funny how many time i hear people talikng about it and they are referring to asthma meds. this steroid witch hunt is a joke, rappers, how about all the hollywood movie stars, sly stalone in all the rockys, bruce willis in the buff roles, will smith was looking pretty buff . mr t, hell even carrot top was looking buffed out.

Jan. 15 2008 10:17 PM
Randy Paul from Jackson Heights, NY

Beta blockers are banned for archery and shooting events in the Olympics. It enhances their ability to relax.

Jan. 15 2008 12:03 PM
Music Lover from NJ

What's the deal? Imagine Aerosmith, The Beatles, The Stones, Iggy Pop, Lou Reed et al without their own performance enhancing drugs. Unlike athletics - where an unfair advantage can be conferred to steriod users - music is entertainment.

Jan. 15 2008 12:02 PM
Prof. C.J. Reiss from NY

No one has ever demonstrated that dope helps performance in the arts; people high on it may think so but that doesn't make it so. Of course, maybe we should check the judges of these artist awards! That aside. performance enhancing drugs do improve sports performance.

Jan. 15 2008 12:01 PM
Josh from Jamaica, NY

How about the affect the "super human" images these artist project have on their audiences.

Jan. 15 2008 12:00 PM
AGarzon from ny

Brian,
beta blockers do not enhance performance. they take away the abnormal physical sensations that PREVENT normal behavior. people that go on interviews many times take betablocker to prevent the sweating and trembling that would put theat a disadvantage for getting a job

Jan. 15 2008 11:59 AM
Matthew M. from Bronx, NY

The NP is correct: B-adrenergic blockers are essentially the opposite of adrenaline, so it's unlikely athletes would find them to be performance enhancers.

Jan. 15 2008 11:57 AM
M.D. from NY

as well as CAUSING ATROPHY OF MUSCLES AND TENDONS AND LIGAMENTS!!

Brian--Another sports writer who is irresponsibly misinformed about steroids: STEROIDS DO NOT ENHANCE SKIN AND HAIR--THEY CAUSE ATROPHY OF THEM*

Jan. 15 2008 11:56 AM
Anonymous from NYC

This may be a little off topic, but I am a law student at a top law school in NYC, I won't say which one. Although I do not, I would estimate that 30% of law students at my school use adderall or other drugs to improve "performance" during study sessions before finals and during finals, for example to stay awake and alert during the entire period given for 24 hour take homes.

Jan. 15 2008 11:55 AM
janet from East Village

Should neurostimulants be considered "performance enhancing," too? I've met several law and medical students who use ritalin (a controlled substance given to kids with ADHD) and similar drugs to sit tests and study. They could have a significant advantage over other students.

Jan. 15 2008 11:53 AM
Won from DC

In academia, students use ritalin and adderall as 'performance enhancing drugs' to get better grades.

Jan. 15 2008 11:51 AM
carolita from manhattan

I've heard whispers in the fashion world about people (designers, and others in the business) taking Human Growth Hormone do fight fatigue during the peak seasons. Apparently it makes them feel "great."

Jan. 15 2008 11:49 AM
Gary from Manhattan

Should Viagra be considered a performance-enhancing drug? If so, is it wrong to use it to improve performance. Is Viagra cheating?

Jan. 15 2008 11:47 AM

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