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Ike and Dick

Wednesday, February 06, 2013

Journalist Jeffrey Frank explores the relationship between Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon and tells the history of two powerful and compelling figures in U.S. politics. His book Ike and Dick: A Portrait of a Strange Political Marriage traces the path of their relationship in a dangerous world and shows why Eisenhower, mortally ill and despite his doubts, supported Nixon’s final attempt to win the White House in 1968—a change influenced by the courtship of Nixon’s daughter by Eisenhower's grandson.

Guests:

Jeffrey Frank

Comments [4]

further correction:
As was usual in California at the time, both Nixon and Voorhis cross-filed in the other party's primary, a practice Voorhis had long adopted. Winning both primaries virtually assured election. Each candidate won his own party's primary, with Voorhis garnering a considerable number of votes in the Republican primary, and outpolling Nixon by 7,000 votes overall. Nixon gained momentum, however, when the newspapers pointed out that Voorhis's total percentage of the vote had decreased from 60% in 1944 to 53.5%.[44]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Voorhis

Feb. 07 2013 07:54 AM

Correction, not the Primary but the General election:
Voorhis advocated the purchase by the Federal Government of the stock in the Federal Reserve Banks, which was held by the member banks, as a way of financing government expenditures and briefly got President Roosevelt to support the measure until the President's advisers caused Roosevelt to change his mind.[27] Voorhis later allied with future House Banking Committee chairman Wright Patman to force Federal Reserve Banks to pay most of the interest they earned on federal securities to the U.S. Government, rather than to the bank stockholders.[28] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Voorhis

Feb. 06 2013 01:53 PM

I heard that Nixon answered a want ad by Prescott Bush to primary
for the House of Representatives in 1946 against the last opponent of the Federal Reserve.

Feb. 06 2013 01:47 PM
Amy from Manhattan

Did Pres. Eisenhower change his opinion of Sen. Kennedy after JFK actually became president?

Feb. 06 2013 01:43 PM

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