Streams

Doctoroff Legacy

Friday, December 07, 2007

Majora Carter, executive director of Sustainable South Bronx, and Mitchell Moss professor of Urban Planning and Policy at NYU, weigh in on Doctoroff's impact on the five boroughs.

Guests:

Majora Carter and Mitchell Moss
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Comments [12]

Damian from Brooklyn

Under Doctoroff we've seen the continuing gentrification and up-scaling of neighborhood after neighborhood. It's pretty clear his "vision" for New York is a sanitized, homogenous high-rise paradise for chain stores and banks.

I'm sure if you run a city it's better to drive out the poor and working class in favor of a high tax base of wealthy people. That's clearly what's happening. Keep just enough working class folks around to staff the service industries, and price the rest out.

The idea that there's any "Jane Jacobs" aspect to Doctoroff's work is just laughable. Thank god the Olympic bid failed or we'd be looking at even more top-down "improvements".

(By the way, you BARELY scratched the surface of Doctoroff's legacy, then moved on to an utterly pointless segment about internet access on airplanes. Great, some people can check in with their offices while they're on planes. Who gives a crap? Do your job and cover things of SIGNIFICANCE to your listeners.)

Dec. 07 2007 11:51 AM
Sean Pisano from Brooklyn

Wake up! This city is going down the tubes.. Most people can't afford to live in this city and all this rich persons development is just making it worse.

Dec. 07 2007 11:30 AM
BORED

STOP THE BELLY-ACHING You get what you pay for. i wonder if that $1 was before or after taxes.

Dec. 07 2007 11:30 AM
Robert from NYC

Who is this guy? He's full of nonsense and he's totally avoiding the issues in praise of this administration. Who is he related to? Or who psys him other than NYU? Oh pleeeeeze they broke the mold.

Dec. 07 2007 11:29 AM
christauf from Brooklyn

I used to live just off Myrtle Ave.. I have had to leave East Williamsburg and Greenpoint in the past three years. What I just posted about "Market Forces" in response to your last guest applies to this guest in regards to "Development".

While waiting for market forces to determine the diversity of retail opportunities available to my former neighborhoods, or maybe, appropriate levels of amenities my real income "when adjusted for" "scum bag landlords" has plummeted. Whenever I hear someone say "market forces" I wait a second to hear who will have the privilege of taking my money.

Economists use such impersonal language that you might think no personal, human deciscions were made. In fact, no landlord that I've ever had to deal with was forced to do anything. They have chosen to break laws and I have not ever had the retainer fee to hire a lawyer to challenge them. Market forces are not analogous to thermodynamics they are analogous military force. That is to say their greed has the force of law.

Dec. 07 2007 11:25 AM
John from Staten Island

Comment about Rob Walsh of NYC Small Business, he was previously manager of Union Square BID before North Carolina

Dec. 07 2007 11:21 AM
Denice from Brooklyn

Majora Carter is an amazing community leader and activist and I agree with her views on Doctoroff 100%.

Dec. 07 2007 11:16 AM
TM from Brooklyn

So he compares favorably to Robert Moses? I would hope any one would. Praising him for not bulldozing homes? Of course he shouldn't. This is like praising him for having ten fingers and walking around.

Dec. 07 2007 11:15 AM
i from nyc

The "sleeper fact" of this story is the news that he's leaving to become head of Bloomberg LP. Quite a nice pay-off for Doctoroff's years of pushing the Bloomberg agenda with a much lauded $1 a year salary. Plus, whatever happened to the Mayor's pledges that he would take a hands-off approach to running the co. while in office?

Dec. 07 2007 11:14 AM
Robert from NYC

Good!! he'll be going. What did he do that was good? What legacy? What's the mayor talking about the best legacy since Robert Moses who was no bargain himself. Moses destroyed the Bronx with that Cross Bronx Expressway. The mayor is full of crap as usual. These people don't need bulldozers they ARE bulldozers. The Yankee Stadium project is criminal and the Bronx Borough President is part of that. How much of a cut did he get, that nobody know-nothing.

Dec. 07 2007 11:12 AM
Leo from Queens

Though Mr. Doctoroff is well intended, the huge problem the city faces is that we have these outsiders who migrate to Manhattan (Including Mayor Bloomber) and consider NYC to be ONLY Manhattan. When developing economic policy related business, Transportation, education, the arts, etc. they NEVER consider the outer boroughs. Queens or The Bronx have as much weight in a Manhattan centric development policy as Omaha Nebraska. The sections of the City that contain more than 80% of the city population are considered, at best, 'Bridge and Tunnel people' or at worse as free-loaders or whiners. We see this in the 'Congestion pricing' tax on all goods and services coming or going out of the city or on the failed stadium on the West side of Midtown. Doctoroff, like many of these outsiders consider themselves so superior to have made it in Manhattan that ignore anything that may remind them of the rural or average American cities they originally came from.

Dec. 07 2007 11:06 AM
John from Staten Island

He spent too much time promoting the Olympics for NYC and West side Stadium. His impact is that he is a self promoter with minimal interest in the benefit of working New Yorkers. Did he manage to keep jobs in NYC?

Dec. 07 2007 10:38 AM

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