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Fare Play

Tuesday, September 25, 2007

WNYC reporter Beth Fertig looks at the two ways the MTA is proposing to increase subway fares.

Guests:

Beth Fertig

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Comments [11]

paulb from Prospect Heights, Brooklyn

I just got a new folding bike and have been using it to ride to work in Manhattan from Brooklyn. If I factor in the cost of the bike and its maintenance, I don't think it's any cheaper (maybe slightly) than taking the subway for the part of the year when the weather allows its use--assuming I don't get into a crash and need major repair to either myself or the bike. The subway is frequently unpleasant but I don't see how anyone who lives in a one-fare zone can complain that it's expensive. And a peak/off-peak fare structure is consistent with sound economics.

The Second Avenue subway...Now that's an interesting issue. No room here for my opinions about that.

Sep. 25 2007 10:35 PM
Constantine Tzanis from New York, NY

oh contraire!

No previous weekend subway discount?

Attached an exerpt from the New York Times FYI column from May, 2003:

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E0CEEDC153FF932A25756C0A9659C8B63

4 Fares in 4 Days

Despite pledging to ''hold the fare'' in the 1973 mayoral campaign, Mayor Abraham D. Beame had little choice in 1975 but to acquiesce to the M.T.A. decision to raise fares. The 43 percent increase was met with demonstrations, and civic groups encouraged passengers to enter through exit gates without paying.

The increase caused an odd pricing situation. At the time, half-price fares were offered on Sundays and holidays. The fare on Saturday, Aug. 30, was 35 cents; on Sunday it was 17 cents. On Monday, Sept. 1, the fares went up but because it was Labor Day, the price was 25 cents. The next day, the fare rose to 50 cents. Four different subway fares in four consecutive days was unprecedented.

Sep. 25 2007 12:10 PM
Deena from brooklyn

on hearing about the options for the MTA fare hike I really thought Brian's "burning question" about the MTA hike proposals would be: How the MTA can program their scanners to determine the time of day people ride, but still have too much trouble programming the scanners to read a $.10 increase instead of $.25?

The MTA are really masters when it comes to making convenient excuses.

Sep. 25 2007 12:04 PM
markbnj from www.my-poem-a-day.blogspot or markbnj.blogspot.com

So Brian (Beth--)

I called in and asked about the 2nd avenue tunnel that was COMPLETED between 23rd street and St. Marks Place.

(and I explained that parts of the tunnel were leased out after the project fizzled for RECORDS storage...)

And Beth said,

most of the tunnel is usable, but SOME of it will be retained for storage

SO those 99 year leases (I presume) for the STORAGE will OVER-RIDE the need of the public(and eminent domain WONT be used to void those leases???)

N ext comment.

IF the DAMNED tunnel is ALREADY built, why wasnt that the first section to be completed

or was it just that the 63rd street tunnelk was such a fiasco, it needed to be offloaded again!

Please give us more info Beth!

Mark Brown in NJ

Sep. 25 2007 12:01 PM
Morarji (Mo) Mejia from Bronx

I think we should not accept either of the proposed fare hikes. The MTA have to fix their financial practices, it’s easier when
someone-else have to pay for their mistake. They cut jobs by introducing the Metro-card machines. We as New Yorkers have to unify and do something similar to something call the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Brian, I like your show

Sep. 25 2007 12:00 PM
clay

What about raising rates for the suburbanites? Why does the NYCTA have to carry the weight of the entire MTA?

Sep. 25 2007 11:57 AM
dp

crowded trains are already enough incentive to deter unnecessary rush hour trips!

Sep. 25 2007 11:57 AM
justin from Manhattan

The reason to have a fair fare hike is supposedly to be able to pay for the increased costs.
Why instead of just simply raising fares why doesn't the MTA have a contest to come up with creative ways to lower costs. Thereby they can keep their existing services and support their operations. I am of the thinking that an organization like MTA is filled with inefficiencies. Having a contest allows for creative open source solutions to cutting costs beyond cutting jobs. The winner(s) can get a years travel on MTA for free.

Sep. 25 2007 11:54 AM
MILAN from manhattan

did anybody ever discuss standing room only subway cars?

Sep. 25 2007 11:53 AM
ab from nyc

yeah...basically.

Are their books public now?

Sep. 25 2007 11:52 AM
CH from NYC

So those of us who are doing the right think by using mass transit for our rush-hour, PEAK commute to work are now going to pay more???!!!

Sep. 25 2007 11:47 AM

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