Streams

One Week After Newtown; NRA Speaks

Friday, December 21, 2012

Paul Barrett, assistant managing editor of Bloomberg Businessweek and author of Glock:The Rise of America's Gun, discusses how reactions after shootings have influenced gun control in the past, and how different weapons might require different legislation. Plus: reaction to the NRA press conference this morning.

Guests:

Paul Barrett

The Morning Brief

Enter your email address and we’ll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.

Comments [130]

Margaret from UWS Manhattan

"You know, when [a young man in Venezuela in the La Sistema youth orchestra program] was handed a clarinet, he said it felt very different from a gun, and it changed his life." Conductor Marion Alsop on Scott Simon's program.

Dec. 22 2012 03:06 PM

let's hope there is no such thing as an insane armed school security guard?!

Dec. 21 2012 07:56 PM
Jim from Williamsburg

Robin G: truthfully, that's not a very intelligent comment.
Blame where blame is due: How about taxing the mentally ill people's families who did not seek help or take the appropriate action to keep these things from happinging. How about taxing the CT shooter's rich father, who apparently paid no attention to him. He's to blame in a big way and I don't hear a peep about him???
How about, for once someone actually think before making a comment like that. What have law abiding gun owning SPORTSMEN AND SPORTSWOMEN to do with the sick people who commit these crimes? Nothing.
WTF is wrong with our society?

Dec. 21 2012 05:49 PM
Jim from Williamsburg

Becky, with respect, you are being emotional and I do not know what "truth" you refer to and further, you pose a question akin to how do I go out my door in the morning and make sure I have a safe and wonderful day: You can not-- it is impossible.
As to your example: Most people don't just "become" mentally ill. If we had a truly responsible society where people cared about one another instead of shunning people who we notice need help, those people who are mentally ill, for whatever reason, would be noticed and treated. And if a mentally ill person had access to firearms one would hope at least SOMEONE would care enough to bring it to the local law enforcement agency's attention, thus having THE FIREARM(S) removed from the equation.
But, like I said, the full problem is not guns alone, the problem is most human being's absolute selfishness and disregard for other people in need of help.

Dec. 21 2012 05:41 PM
Robin G from NYC

I propose that the NRA themselves pay for the armed security guards they want to see placed in every single school in the country.

Or else tax all gun owners to pay for it.

Dec. 21 2012 05:03 PM

Let's remember that this school had safety measures. Lanza was the child of an employee. Would an armed guard really have stopped him? Or would Lanza, the "monster" simply have found a way? Come on.

Dec. 21 2012 03:27 PM

My nephew and nieces lives ar more important than ANY amount of mnid screwing the NRA's PR gurus can come up with. Blame the mentally ill? Arm every school? As if an armed guard could not be shot from a distance? Ever been to a country where they are guns at everty store and bank? PASS LAWS TO REDUCE ACCESS TO THESE ASSAULT WEAPONS.

Dec. 21 2012 03:22 PM
Steve

The bigots that are calling for stricter gun control are the same people who won't make a peep about the children that are being slaughtered in Pakistan and Yemen on a regular basis.

Dec. 21 2012 01:49 PM
sunny from NY

Who gets out of it?

There are too much guns out there. Never about no guns at school . NRA speech was ridiculously selfish and insensitive to those children that lost their lives. We should not waste their deaths and know what killed them! It was guns! Guns are so easily accessible to anyone. Why? That’s the point!

We should all aime country without guns (except ONLY to the officers and military). Not easy to be like Japan or South Korea that has no guns policy.but we can start to learn from what Canadian do for gun control, very difficult. It’s like taking a driver license in France, Germany or Japan. Difficult and tricky paper test and not easy driving test, including a parallel parking between two cars and shift change (yes, shits!) at 45 degree slope without letting car going down. The fees to get those tests are not cheap either.

If a gun license is hard and expensive, many will not have guns. and then, slowly and definitely change the course of owning guns to less guns to no guns. It may not be easy but when I think of those innocent children, we must need be a no gun country.
“Gun = Not Safe!”

For NRA argues, using for protecting family from intruders. Then, let's find out from previous police records of how many times guns were used to protect from intruders in a passed? I highly doubt it is much less than NRA thinks and argues.

I have only tried to shoot a soda can once with a rifle (don't know what kind). What I got from that experience was a sense of (false) power. Immediately, I felt I could take over anything. It gave instant power. It was addictive and very dangerous. I could see clearly why it’s so dangerous to a wrong people.

How many Americans recreationally owning and using guns? What’s so recreational about going out to kill animals? Young ones around you watch and listen how exciting shooting was from his father, brother or friends and they even let those children tried and introduce this expensive recreation(?).

Who gets out of it? Is it manufactories of firearms?
Who pays for it? Innocent children?
Why only happens in suburb but not major cities?

Dec. 21 2012 01:24 PM
Nick from UWS

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34eHactsGVI

Dec. 21 2012 12:36 PM
The Truth from Becky

JIM again in CT *smdh*, 1)what happens when the "mentally Healthy" person who purchased the gun, becomes the "mentally ill" How do we regulate that? Huh?

Dec. 21 2012 12:07 PM

Mr. Lapierre avoided one MAJOR point: assault weapons. There is NO GOOD CAUSE for any civilian to own such weaponry. The NRA has stretched the 2nd Amendment beyond its intentions. The right to bear arms was crafted in a time when there was no effective police force. We do not live in a society where we have to fear our government enforcing martial law, like in desperate 3rd world nations. So OK, let people own guns, after a THOROUGH AND CAREFUL SCREENING. But do not allow them to own weapons that are designed for military use.

Dec. 21 2012 12:04 PM
Jim from Williamsburg

I am an independent and abhor any position republican-- and, the CT school shooting is wrong beyond words. However, it mystifies me that otherwise fair and seemingly intelligent people become untruthful and hateful when talking about gun control. WNYC (I listen about 5 hours a day) hosts and anti-gun guests find the subject so abhorrent they can't bother to brief themselves on correct gun terminology, never mind gun facts. Why do seemingly intelligent people spew hate at well over half the population that are sportsmen and sportswomen being good, lawful citizens? I go to gun ranges and see creepy people all the time-- I go to meetings with citizen groups and see creepy people. It would be nice to get rid of all creepy people but since we can not do that we need to change only the laws that need to be changed. I advocate the right for mentally healthy people to have a legal handgun carry permit for protection against harm (i.e., the CT shooter). If a responsible CT school employee (principal / teacher) would have had a handgun permit there would be a lot more wonderful, little children (and adults) alive today. We need to face today’s problems and we can learn much from Israel on this point. It weakens the NRA's (I am NOT an NRA fan) domino effect position, but in truth NO SPORTSMAN needs to own an assault rifle or any high capacity magazine. I have been shooting firearms as a sportsman for over 35 years and it gives me the creeps when I go to a gun range and see the collection of idiots, among the sportsmen and sportswomen, waving around AK-47s and AR-15's. Most of these guys (and no shortage of women) are no more than semi-dangerous idiots, but over the years I have clearly seen some that are potentially seriously dangerous. Therein lies the ENTIRE "gun problem". We need to have a data base for people with mental problems and we need to have a serious review of anyone who has acting in a way as to be seen to endanger or potentially endanger someone else while handling weapons. Again, I am 100% pro gun ownership, but for responsible sportsmen, sportswomen,and checked and clear legal handgun permit owners, not "gun nuts". It is much not talked about outside gun circles but there are two things sportsman hate above all else, one is rabid anti-gun people who are incorrect in terminology and fact and venomous towards the wrong people and even more, the absolute slobs and nuts that own "stupid guns" like assault rifles and 50 caliber rifles. I can also tell you I have known over a hundred law enforcement people over the years and I know in my heart about 30%-40% of these law enforcement people have been the most thuggish and dangerous people I have ever seen handle guns-- especially some NYPD personnel I have known. In closing, my sincerest and deepest sympathies for the families who lost loved ones or children in ANY shooting. SOLUTION: CARE AND ATTENTION FROM SOCIETY FOR MENTALLY ILL PEOPLE BEFORE THEY HARM ANYONE.

Dec. 21 2012 12:01 PM
Joe from nearby

If Nanacy Lanza hadn't been armed to the teeth the way LaPierre wants...

......20 little children & their teachers would still be alive.

Dec. 21 2012 12:00 PM
jawbone

Thank you, Katie Kennedy, for a pragmatic view of teachers packing heat -- or, as you describe, having gun lockers in their classrooms, with a separate ammo safe, and they're going to get all this together while the bullets are flying? Riiiight.

Plus, having taught in a large urban high school where I had to move from room to room, carrying my books and teaching materials, where does the gun get stashed? Under whose responsibility? Because there will be liability on the gun holder, the school, the officials of the school district, probably the civic entitity which funds the school.

Once I had a classroom to call my own, I had my wallet lifted while walking in a crowded hall. Yeah, he or she or they were that good.

Who can predict that won't happen to a gun?

Yeah, that's what we need, a gun in the hands of kids in a crowded school.

Dec. 21 2012 12:00 PM
Maxwell Q. James from manhattan

As many have pointed out most gun owners are responsible individuals that do not automatically oppose some sort of gun control. It would therefore seemm that these individuals should resign en mass form the NRA and start their own association - one that emphasizes responsibilty and a measured approach to gun control (the way the NRA used to be) This would deprive fanatics like the LaPierre of the funding to hold .Americans hostage to their idiotic view of America and hopefully begin a reasonable dialog on the issues

Dec. 21 2012 11:57 AM
foodaggro from Brooklyn

Music videos on MTV?? Hey you paranoid, out of touch, coward, MTV hasn't played videos in decades!
But more importantly, you're trying to blame the media in your self-serving, irresponsible, CRAZY speech.

Dec. 21 2012 11:57 AM
Nick from UWS

Yeah, and what happens when one of those proposed underpaid rent-a-cops loses his own mind and takes his NRA and legally sanctioned weapon into the school that he was assigned to protect and snaps?

Dec. 21 2012 11:54 AM
Jenny from Brooklyn from Brooklyn

Nancy Lanza may've had guns in her home precisely as the NRA advocates -- to protect herself against an armed assailant. What happened to her is exactly what typically happens to gun-owners: someone in their own household accidentally or purposefully shoots them.

It's ridiculous for La Pierre to argue that the Sandy Hook principal should've been armed. Was she supposed to wear a holster to be ready at all times.

Nancy Lanza was armed and look what happened to her. Making guns more accessible and pervasive is clearly not a solution.

Dec. 21 2012 11:52 AM
Clif from Mid-town

I feel sorry for the last caller, Jason, who (seemingly based on LaPierre's speech) decided he's going to join the NRA. The solution to the gun problem is simply NOT to hand out more guns. We also have to ask ourselves what kind of world we want to create for ourselves. Do we really want to have armed guards surrounding our schools? I know that it seems counter-intuitive to me. A place of "higher learning" surrounded by armed guards?

This is a complex issue that needs an honest debate based on facts. The most obvious thing to me is to not make these kinds of assault weapons available to the public. It's simply not necessary. These weapons are designed and intended to kill as many people as possible in the shortest amount of time. They are OFFENSIVE weapons not DEFENSIVE weapons. If the NRA is serious about responsible gun ownership then they have to acknowledge this fact. Having a basic pistol in your home for protection is a lot different than owning multiple assault weapons.

Furthermore, the intent of the 2nd ammendment was surely not protect the right of someone to go out and kill a bunch of children. The NRA is an antiquated organization that is confused about it's role in the modern world. They need to join us in the 21st century and re-evaluate their position based on the facts.

Dec. 21 2012 11:52 AM
Suzanne from Yorkville

Thank you for this discussion. I do not agree with your guest that if the principal of Sandy Hook had been armed and trained that this horror would necessarily have been averted. Maybe. But this would mean that she would have been carrying her weapon from room to room, office to office. I always find this argument disturbing. It supposes that when the armed person enters the movie theater, the church, the school, your home - with the element of surprise on their side - it supposes that you will have your weapon ready at your side, in the same room.

Dec. 21 2012 11:51 AM
RM from NYC

A plea for safety from guns, from a 9-year-old:

http://www.change.org/petitions/a-kid-s-petition-against-gun-violence

Dec. 21 2012 11:51 AM
Amy from Manhattan

I'm sorry to hear a teacher showing such either-or thinking. There's no contradiction btwn. saying Mr. LaPierre is right about many of the points he made & saying that he's wrong about 1 very salient one & that it's a glaring error for him not to acknowledge the role of the proliferation of guns his organization has made possible. What worries me is that the caller is probably passing that kind of thinking on to his students.

Dec. 21 2012 11:50 AM

If the principal had been armed, it's still unknown whether she would have been able to take down the shooter. Just arming, without situational (combat) training & practice she might freeze, and even soldiers with all their constant training have been known to freeze in combat.

Dec. 21 2012 11:50 AM
Zehner from Pennsylvania


Mr. LaPierre's early comments about how in our society utilizes fire-arms to protect public officials, our homes, money, and other precious things, but, oddly, not children in schools. Policy-wise, the notions of passing legislation to keep military style weapons out of the hands of privet citizens (who have no use for them, other then to commit violent acts) and providing armed security guards for schools, to protect our children, should not be viewed as incompatible. Only in a hyper divided and polarized nation, like ours, would few of our legislators reach such a logical conclusion

Dec. 21 2012 11:49 AM
Sheldon from Brooklyn

Becky - those chickens have left their coops. There are too many guns in circulation to ban them.

Dec. 21 2012 11:49 AM
DarkSymbolist from NYC!

@ Silvia
"Mr. LaPierre is disgusted that video games are creating a violent society but finds it completely acceptable that people should unleash their stress by shooting thousands of rounds at gun ranges?"

I can't agree more. It astounds me that these people are going to blame a video game which is not real...and yet they go and stockpile ASSAULT RIFLES and go shooting them off at gun ranges and have the nerve to turn around and blame TV, movies, video games for violence....I mean...it's obscenely hypocritical.

Dec. 21 2012 11:48 AM
Brendan O from Brooklyn, NY

What's so disturbing about La Pierre's position is that the broader logic--the forest through the trees--is that he's betting on the disintegration of civil society rather than trying to invest in it and nurture it.

Dec. 21 2012 11:47 AM
Nick from UWS

The NRA news conference is fully as repulsive and insane as I expected it to be. Not one single word about reducing guns in the USA.

Dec. 21 2012 11:47 AM
Christine from Westchester

To EJ: how do you propose a gun "prohibition" will work? You think those criminals will abide by that? And how did the prohibition of alcohol work out? People had it and imbibed any way. If you can't offer a real solution, stay on the porch.

Dec. 21 2012 11:46 AM
Laura

The college in the town where I grew up had armed security guards on campus. But an overzealous guard shot an innocent student.

Dec. 21 2012 11:46 AM
lcruz from brooklyn

so we all agree that desensitization of killing,starting early in our lives by exposure to violent video games, films and media overall is not a problem,since the prevailing view on the thread is, guns == bad, violent actions conditioning == a non issue towards long term behavior , I have a little bridge for sale, any takers ?

Dec. 21 2012 11:46 AM
John A.

The glaring omission to his argument, the one that I see, is 'guns protect everything we hold dear' but this: they in the cases he listed are always in the hands of trained individuals. Allow everyone to have a gun, sure, everyone who goes through a year of training and evaluation.

Dec. 21 2012 11:45 AM
The Truth from Becky

The second amendment was needed in it's time, we do not live in the 1700s anymore,(didn't include a lot of us anyway) stop referring to it as your excuse to remain armed...criminals don't care or know what the constitution says BUT, they DO know how to obtain and use guns, legally and illegally..remove the gun from the equation and it's back to hand to hand combat..what are you afraid of?

Dec. 21 2012 11:45 AM
g from staten island

If the principal at Newton were trained and had a gun to use, what if the gunman shot her berfore she shot him?

An armed guard in each school? As you said, at the sport stadiam there are multiple guards--not one guard. Are you going to have the money to surround a school with multiple guards? Some schools, such as in NYC are so big that having one armed guard at the main entrance will be almost useless. By the time that guard gets to the area of the school where the shooter is, a shooter with a semiautomatic will have shot up that part of the school. It is probably safer and maybe cheaper to get the "weapons of mass destruction" and other guns away from the populace through background checks and restricted sales.

Dec. 21 2012 11:45 AM
J. England from FL

Mental illness is not the issue. It is, as you say, a distracting issue. The issue is high capacity magazines. Classifying weapons as "assault rifles" is a losing game. You'll never get them all. But limiting the amount of rounds that can be fired takes a lot of the "assault" out of the rifle. In my opinion, that's the best place to start. Six rounds seems like enough capacity to me.

Dec. 21 2012 11:45 AM
Sheldon from Brooklyn

La Pierre is right on the money on the media and its hypocritical celebration of gun culture (albeit, last time I checked - they have their 1st amendment rights.) However, the press conference - with its belligerent and accusatory tones was a disaster.

Dec. 21 2012 11:45 AM
Fred Kearney from new jersey

Imagine a shoot out in an elementary school classroom with a lone "security guard" or even a police officer and a mentally ill teenager armed with an "assault rifle" with several 30 round clips. It's a recipe for a tragedy beyond our most horrible nightmare. It is wishful thinking to believe that such a guard, probably armed with a 9mm hand gun, will deter a determined attacker. It is fantasy that such a person could stop the entry of the derranged teenager with his/her assault rifle without many others being hurt.

Dec. 21 2012 11:44 AM
RJ from prospect hts

He's *not* quoting accurate data!!! Let's not perpetrate *that* inaccuracy!!!

Having a national database of the mentally ill is absurd. The continuum of who presents with symptoms of mental illness is massive--and will most absolutely stigmatize. If the Department of Defense can be hacked, do you think this list would not be? How many would be wanting to blackmail people on it?

One instance that the principal, isolated with the armed guy, does not public policy make. It's not the rule--and using the exception to make policy would be disastrous.

Dec. 21 2012 11:44 AM
Fred from Manhattan

Yes! More legal guns is not in and of itself a "bad" thing.

Dec. 21 2012 11:44 AM
Katie Kennedy from Huntington, NY

OK, so we are the teachers, who must keep the gun locked up, with ammunition in another place entirely. How does the teacher get to this gun when an armed assailant charges into her room? And imagine the outcry, when a child manages to get his or her hands on the gun, as children are wont to do, and he accidentally kills himself or a friend.

Dec. 21 2012 11:44 AM
Adrienne from Inwood

Thank you for turning off the NRA PR fest. The only way in which it can be considered a "news" conference is in the sense that the media is all there covering it. LaPierre is armed--with guns, money and a megaphone--and dangerous. He's a one man walking argument for a small arms race. Haven't we learned from the lunacy of the nuclear arms race?

Guns used in domestic violence and suicide are among the most lethal use of our national embrace of weapons. We have created a violent society. No doubt. Good luck trying to figure out who's "mentally ill," who's a danger to themselves or others. Men who abuse the women in their lives aren't typically classified as mentally ill. It's too much of a norm to be considered an "illness." Making it easier for people to kill other people or themselves is the definition of insane.

Btw, 27 people were murdered in Newtown last week. Why isn't the killer's first victim being included in the count among most reports?

Dec. 21 2012 11:44 AM

My husband, who grew up conservative, explained to me that his family's attachment to guns stems from the evangelical reading of the Book of Revelation, where the central government (or the anti-Christ) will take over and gun control is only a symptom of this take over.

He stays away from any discussion about guns with his family and advises me to do the same. I grew up atheist and have no idea how to even approach such beliefs. How would we ever have a meaningful conversation about guns when the cultural gap is so deep and wide? Policy can take us only so far.

Dec. 21 2012 11:44 AM
Steve from NYC

The only mentally ill on the recommended list would be those who go through the legal system. To a great degree this would affect the poor more than the wealthy as the latter group is obviously much more likely to be able to afford private mental health care and also be able to hire the legal might to have legal records expunged if a family member does become involved in the legal system.
It's very strange that the second amendment advocates who claim that they need guns to prevent someone like Hitler from taking over the country want to do what he did to the mentally ill in Germany.

Dec. 21 2012 11:43 AM
David from Harrisonburg, VA

A mentally ill registry? How do we define mental illness? If someone is declared clinically depressed, does that mean that they are put on a mentally ill registry? What would this mean for police officers?

Dec. 21 2012 11:43 AM
Christine from Westchester

Blaming the NRA for the problems is not right. We have elected officials. It's on them to do what needs to be done. Why is the background check system not a solid, standard, must use system? Because the NRA is stopping it? No-- it's our legislation that has not done what is needed. We the people are largely saying we want that and we want to ban assault weapons. NRA or no, we have no one to blame but our representatives who have to stop blaming others too and get it done.

Dec. 21 2012 11:42 AM
Derek from Brooklyn

This whole mental health issue is so misguided. So many people who have gone on shooting rampages were not 'mentally ill' but rather just emotionally disturbed and unstable - and that those around them did not pay attention to their warning signs.
And if MORE GUNS = SAFETY then why are all other developed countries so much safer from gun violence and ALSO have MANY less guns in the population??

Dec. 21 2012 11:42 AM
nicole

Sadly la Pierre is being treated as if he is the president. Who else gets as much air time?? He is one of those monstor deamons who he mentions. To be for putting guns in criminal hands and for arming anyone else against them just demonstrates a desire to destabalize society with arms so that there are even fewer restrictions. His ideas are unstable and should not be give the time of day.

Dec. 21 2012 11:41 AM
Roger from New York

LaPierre's comments are sickening, but not surprising: they reflect a profound illness in American society. Guns and drugs have a great deal in common. Both are fixtures of American culture, and each signals different forms of addiction. Heroin and cocaine are outlawed, yet firearms - which are responsible for thousands of death annually - are not only freely available but are considered symbols of the American spirit. An addict thinks another fix is the answer. LaPierre's attitude is no different - put guns in the hands of even more people, and we'll largely solve our ills. Gun-related killings and injuries will continue to be synonymous with life in America as long as reasonable people are passive in the face of LaPierre's propaganda.

Dec. 21 2012 11:41 AM
DaB from Manhattan

Guns in schools...?!?

Insane.

My 13 year old daughter, who toured many high schools this year, felt the most scared, and INSECURE, in those schools with metal detectors and a heavy guard presence.

I can't believe that the science supports 'more guns' = 'safer environment.'

Dec. 21 2012 11:41 AM
Camille from Brooklyn, NY

My school was on lockdown and surrounded by cops when I was in high school and I just felt like I was in prison. Like we were locked in rather than protected. Awful, awful feeling and I would never send my kid to a school where teachers were armed or that was surrounded by commandoes.

Dec. 21 2012 11:41 AM
Silvia from Hastings-on-Hudson

Mr. LaPierre is disgusted that video games are creating a violent society but finds it completely acceptable that people should unleash their stress by shooting thousands of rounds at gun ranges? I must be missing something - and I grew up on a farm within a family that uses guns for warding off hawks and rattlesnakes. As the mother of 3 small boys I am appalled that the NRA has been so successful in promoting high-capacity guns as a form of recreation for the weekend warrior set.

Dec. 21 2012 11:41 AM
EJ

I'm sorry its totally idiotic to advocate for restricting gun use. It is likewise absolutely moronic to argue for gun proliferation. WE need ABSOLUTE gun PROHIBITION.

Dec. 21 2012 11:40 AM
Nick from UWS

The NRA has absolutely CREATED this situation, and what they propose will absolutely MAKE IT WORSE.

Dec. 21 2012 11:39 AM
lisa from brooklyn

NRA SHOULD PUT THEIR EFFORTS AND MONEY INTO LINING THE COAT CLOSETS IN SCHOOL CLASSROOMS WITH KEVLAR. THIS WILL PROTECT STUDENTS AND STAFF WITH NO ADDED GUNS!!

Dec. 21 2012 11:39 AM
Martin from brooklyn

Good lord - this conversation is way off track. BAN ASSAULT WEAPONS! Schools are not the issue - Guns are.

Dec. 21 2012 11:36 AM
Sarah from Hell's Kitchen

Wayne LaPierre sounds like he thinks we all live in an episode of the Walking Dead.

I'm a teacher and what I keep thinking about was how Victoria Soto attempted and was unable to lock the door to her room to keep the shooter out. Can't we start there?

Dec. 21 2012 11:36 AM
JMD from NYC

Interesting the way the NRA helps flood our country with guns and then takes the position that we need more guns to protect ourselves from those gun-toting people.

Dec. 21 2012 11:36 AM
Shawn Onsgard from Brooklyn

The NRA director's arguments about arming law enforcement and security officers reveals an opening to reduce gun ownership in the general population. What if the headline were "NRA backs away from civilian gun ownership rights."

Dec. 21 2012 11:36 AM
DarkSymbolist from NYC!

So this idiot wants schools to become the wild west. That's the answer.
Arming teachers and principals...really bad idea.
And as for guards....just because you have qualified guards doesn't mean you'll stop crazy people from doing what they are going to do. Ever hear of Kennedy? Reagan and Brady? Hello?????? There were secret service men there in those cases.

Wow...just wow.......

Dec. 21 2012 11:36 AM

When my son was in nursery school, they did have armed guards with machine guns and full body armor after 9/11. It was sickening. So we're all going to escalate to the point that we walk around ready to shoot the slightest threat at a moment's notice? Our unarmed security guard in elementary school, managed to neutralize a middle schooler who threatened a mother with what looked like a gun. It was one of those realistic guns.

Seriously, I've been doing Martial Arts for four years. I know I could defend myself against someone who wasn't trained in Martial Arts, but I'm under no delusions that I could take down someone who trained seriously in Martial Arts and wanted to attack me. Ditto for guns. I'd have to practice constantly. Ridiculous.

Dec. 21 2012 11:35 AM
Nick from UWS

NOBODY WANTS A COUNTRY WHERE YOU ARE SEARCHED EVERY GODDAMN MINUTE AND SUPERVISED EVERY GODDAMN MINUTE BY ARMED PERSONNEL IN EVERY SINGLE GODDAMN PLACE

Dec. 21 2012 11:35 AM
Trish from NJ

-People with guns kill people.
-Protect ourselves by buying guns.
-Result: More people with guns.

Dec. 21 2012 11:35 AM
Fred from Manhattan

On All Things Considered, Paul Barrett made just that point. That the only logical way to address these events is to have armed security at schools. As for cost of security, that's for Society to decide. Every decimal point of safety in all arenas is a a costly geometric function.

Dec. 21 2012 11:35 AM
Amy from Manhattan

He's also "equating" people w/mental illnesses w/monsters, even though he later referred to "the mentally ill."

Even so, don't go after him for more than he actually said--I didn't hear him advocate arming teachers & custodians, & saying he did will just give his supporters the chance to say we're exaggerating. He talked about having armed security guards. (And now I just heard Brian pointing this out--thanks! To address something else Brian said, I think this would have to be decided by the states, not the federal gov't.)

Dec. 21 2012 11:35 AM
Joe from nearby

So it's official, folks-
The extremeist NRA leadership doesn't believe our police departments are good enough to do the job entrusted to the.

I wonder how law enforcement feels about this insult.....

Dec. 21 2012 11:35 AM
fuva from harlemworld

Are our schools really that unsafe? Do they have a high rate of gun activity?

Dec. 21 2012 11:34 AM
Ralph from CT

The events of the May 15, 2012 in Newtown Connecticut have had a chilling effect on the entire country. We have all seen the effects of this kind of violence too many times. I believe we need to change the conversation about guns to encourage national policies that protect us all.
With the above said why would I join the NRA? The answer is simple- to be part of the conversation of guns in our society.
The NRA has some valuable beliefs at their core. They want to “Defend our Second Amendment Rights”, which is a very admirable goal. I’m sure many NRA members agree that defending our rights should not be at the expense of protecting our children.
The NRA also provides education and training on gun safety -another admirable goal that I would like to see expanded. If there was more safety training there might be fewer tragedies.
So, how do I hope to change the conversation at the NRA to balance these ideas?
The answer lies in simple arithmetic. There are approximately 4.3 million members of the NRA who value their rights. There are many times that many parents in the United States who want to protect their children. If a small percentage of these parents joined the NRA, they could change the conversation within the NRA. They could:
• Promote Reasonable Gun Control
• Change the organization from being a political organization to being an organization that works in the interest of all to promote safety.
• Change the Board of Directors at the NRA to be more understanding about their new constituent's beliefs
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I joined the NRA online athttps://membership.nrahq.org/forms/signup.asp?campaignid=XR021747
for a discounted membership of $25.
After joining, one of the first things I did was send the above statement to membership@nrahq.org
I hope many will:
1) Join the NRA
2) Voice your opinions on the subject (If you agree with the statement above, send it to membership@nrahq.org with the subject “Why I Joined the NRA”
3) Vote(by proxy) your opinions at the next NRA National Convention in May.
If you do not want to give $25 to the NRA (which I understand) you could do the following:
1) Voice your opinions on the subject (If you agree with the note above, send it to membership@nrahq.org with the subject “Why I’m Considering Joining the NRA”
If you are already a member of the NRA please consider:
1) Sending the above message to membership@nrahq.org with the subject “Why I’m Staying in the NRA” and include your NRA membership ID
2) Vote(by proxy) your opinions at the next NRA National Convention in May.
JOIN THE NRA TO CHANGE THE NRA!

Dec. 21 2012 11:34 AM
Lauren from Bed-Stuy

He's got a lot of nerve accusing the media of hatred and fear in the same breath that he calls people with mental illness evil monsters. That is, as they say, rich. We failed Adam Lanza as tragically as it failed Sandy Hook's kids.

Dec. 21 2012 11:34 AM
ben s from nyc

Actually, why not limit guns those properly trained? Secret service, police, security guards...sure. They have training and such. Make guns extremely difficult to get for everyone else. Less guns = less gun violence.

Dec. 21 2012 11:34 AM
The Truth from Becky

Un-Arm everyone except for the military, police force, FBI and the secret service problem solved. Everyone else in possession of a firearm should be prosecuted

Dec. 21 2012 11:33 AM
RJ from prospect hts

Oh, and all of these school shootings have ended with the gunmen killing themselves.

Dec. 21 2012 11:33 AM
eric from park slope

if armed "good guys" are the remedy to armed "bad guys," how did the Fort Hood shooting occur? I'm pretty sure there were lots of trained, armed good guys there.

Dec. 21 2012 11:32 AM
Richard from Tarrytown from Tarrytown

If we didn't have so many assault weapons available to crazy people then maybe we wouldn't need armed guards in our schools.

Dec. 21 2012 11:31 AM

Mr. LaPierre is one of the crazies he keeps bringing up. I hope he places himself in the insanity database. Did he mention body armor? So sickening....

Dec. 21 2012 11:30 AM
David from nyc

Simple talk, no surprise
When will this country see that we as a people can do better
than this !!

p.s. this guy will work for Fox News one day

Dec. 21 2012 11:30 AM
Nancy from Manhattan

In this nation, in civilized societies, we have police to protect us. Accepting the argument that schools should have armed protection, those who are armed should be police, not educators. We pay the police to protect us. Arming citizens is not the answer in a civilized society, contrary to the insanity offered by the NRA.

Dec. 21 2012 11:30 AM
DarkSymbolist from NYC!

SIIIIIIIIIGGGGGGHHHHHHHH!
Give me a break, nothing La Pierre said really matters. Anyone who thinks that shows like "Breaking Bad" are responsible for mass shootings and shootings in general as opposed to access to guns designed to kill as many people as possible in a short span of time is a morally bankrupt idiot.

Most people can play video games and watch movies, and yes violent ones at that, without having the urge to go out and shoot a bunch of people in real life. Most people can separate reality from fantasy. If an individual plays a game and that makes you committ mass murder there was something wrong with that individual in the first place and I would think then in that case the question is that individual having access to a freaking AR-15!!! I mean a little common sense!

La Pierre and the NRA have blood on their hands and that is even more clear hearing his disgusting morally bankrupt and illogical press conference. What a scumbag. I thought the NRA was just an organization that had some wrong ideas about the 2nd Amendment but now i see they are actually just plain evil.

Dec. 21 2012 11:30 AM

I can only hear the greed and selfishness in wayne’s voice.
Selfish selfish nation!

Dec. 21 2012 11:30 AM
tim from nyc

*qualified* armed security. qualified is the key word.
arming principals and teachers does not constitute a qualified security force.
he makes his own argument against himself.

Dec. 21 2012 11:29 AM
RJ from prospect hts

He conveniently forgets Jim Brady, who was protected by the Secret Service and still was shot. And how about quoting the guy in Arizona who was carrying but decided not to pull it because he wasn't sure, in the chaos of the mass shooting, who the perpetrator was? Especially since one was a good guy with a gun?

Dec. 21 2012 11:29 AM

So the solution to a shootout at school IS more guns and bullets? Who will PAY for these "guards"?

Dec. 21 2012 11:29 AM
Mary from Westchester

We haven't heard the full news conference yet. I trust WNYC, but maybe we are missing some parts that could state that the NRA is going to comment on having stricter gun applications. or why the US has so many guns compared to other countries. I want to hear the full news conference. so I can think critically and decide. I am completely against the NRA but I still want to hear the full news conference. I will listen later to the full conference somewhere. but, so, far what the NRA is saying is pretty terrible, he's not admitting that guns are part of the problem, he says violent videos, mental health issues, media, etc. but he is so far not admitting that too many guns in our country is also part of the problem.

Dec. 21 2012 11:29 AM
Nick from UWS

It's too bad WNYC is not streaming this in its entirety...the insanity of it must be heard to be believed. He is now introducing a proposal for the NRA to supply trained armed security to all schools in the USA.

Dec. 21 2012 11:29 AM
Bob from New York

NRA wants guns in our schools? What's next, each priest and rabbi should carry a loaded weapon during services to protect their congregations? What about mail carriers? Shouldn't they be packing in case they come to the door of a deranged homeowner? What about sports coaches? Some of those parents can get pretty irate about missed calls. Oh hell, let's expand the 2nd amendment requiring every citizen over 18 to own a weapon and include early intervention by mandating all students to take assault rifle target practice as part of the school curriculum. What a country...

Dec. 21 2012 11:28 AM
tim from nyc

are we talking about *banning* guns or *controlling* them?

Dec. 21 2012 11:28 AM
lisa from brooklyn

here is an idea to absolutely protect students and staff: lining coat closets in classrooms with kevlar, with a lock inside the closet. this would pretty much ensure a "safe place" in classrooms. it could be a great solution if it is possible.

Dec. 21 2012 11:27 AM
Marianne from Staten Island

The NRA has its priorities completely backwards by blaiming videogames for violence.
Those games -- I don't like them-- are pure FANTASY !
Guns are REAL and CONCRETE!

MOST PEOPLE CAN DIFFERENCIATE between fantasy and real act; maybe Mr. LaPierre cannot.

4 million NRA members are holding hostage the entire population! Outrageous!

Dec. 21 2012 11:27 AM
Amy from Manhattan

Where is Mr. LaPierre getting his statistics, when because of his own organization's lobbying efforts, the CDC & the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, & Firearms are legally prevented from releasing the data they collect on gun crimes (according to Tom Diaz of the Violence Policy Center in his interview on Fresh Air yesterday, at http://www.npr.org/2012/12/20/167694808/assault-style-weapons-in-the-civilian-market)?

Dec. 21 2012 11:27 AM
RJ from prospect hts

Predictable. Everyone else is to blame; no responsibility taken. He throws in natural disasters? There were minimal acts of violence after Sandy and massive examples of community coming together. (See, as Brian did, Rebecca Solnit's "Paradise Built in Hell.") He cherry picks data--the lowering of crime stats?--and neglects to mention the complete scenario; in this case, widespread, proven incidences of fraudulently lowered crime stats, ma\
manufactured to create that illusion.

Manufactured fear. The American Dream.

Dec. 21 2012 11:26 AM

The solution is armed guards??? Who trusts armed guards that aren't sworn law enforcement officers???? State licensing laws across the country vary so widely that it's possible for the armed guard to be an ex-felon or a problem military discharge.

Your Bloomberg commentator didn't mention those problems with armed guards.

Dec. 21 2012 11:25 AM
Christine from Westchester

Let's call it as we all heard it: this is crazy talk. I'm a second ammendment advocate but with that comes the responsibility: all must have background checks, tighten up that system, take military/ automatic firearms off the market. I think 90% of Americans would agree.

And as for the NRA: I think this guy just lost any sane members they had left. This is good; he's going to cause even gun rights guys to understand the level of crazy the NRA represents.

Dec. 21 2012 11:25 AM
beth from princeton

Horrifying, deeply disturbing, truly scary speech. No retreat, no surrender?!?!?!!!

Dec. 21 2012 11:25 AM
Nick from UWS

Now he is making his pitch...he's proposing that the NRA itself supply armed security to all school in the US. It's just unbelievable.

Dec. 21 2012 11:25 AM
Eli Friedmann from astoria

disgusting. the madness continues.

Dec. 21 2012 11:24 AM
Luna

This is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard. I don't care how many video games, movies or songs I have heard where "violence is glorified" I have seen, I still know that it's wrong to KILL. Not to mention the fact that the "meadi and entertainment industry" has been making gangster movies since Al Capone. Hello? It's not like this is somehting new.

I'm so tired of the same stupid arguments that the NRA has been championing for the last how many decades to justify arming the masses. I'm fine with owning guns in a responsible matter but no one needs an assult rifle outside of a battle zone. I think it's time we start considering such weapons as toold of mass destruction.

Dec. 21 2012 11:24 AM
Dvap from Brooklyn

Fear Mongering at it's finest!

Dec. 21 2012 11:23 AM
The Truth from Becky

Cowards, terrified to be without their weapons...this is NOT about hunting and recreation, this is about certain unnamed persons fear of being caught in hand to to hand combat situation without a firearm...born cowards!!

Dec. 21 2012 11:23 AM
Richard Binkele from Tarrytown

This is psychopathic behavior, blaming everything and everyone else and ignoring your contribution to a national tragedy.

Dec. 21 2012 11:23 AM
Carl from nj from New Jersey

Apparently no NRA members that are furiously buying more and more lethal weapons and ammunition have any of the 'issues' that he is mentioning.
Does he want machine guns mounted on the rooftops at every school in America? Or, is he volunteering NRA members to 'defend' each school?
What a wonderful world!

Dec. 21 2012 11:23 AM

My father was a hunter. I was taught to shoot a rifle. My father actually also rescued animals that were hurt, including a seal pup (which yielded a beating from his mom who found it into her bathtub), a pelican, a racoon, a jack rabbit and an owl. This was not inconsistent with his respect for nature. The leader of the NRA really showed such a huge disrespect for what hunting is really all about with his ignoring the elephant in the room -- the overarmed heavy artillary that are readily available. He is sickening in his bizarre tirade about gun free schools being at fault.

The reason why I don't carry a gun is because I don't think it would help in situations where psychopaths to take everyone out. I would probably miss and shoot the wrong person IF I managed to realize that the person was about to wipe everyone out before they started shooting. The one time when I was confronted with someone waving around a gun talking about shooting his boss was in the Philippines. I managed to talk him out of shooting his boss. Really this is sick to have a totally armed society.

Dec. 21 2012 11:22 AM
Edward from Brooklyn

Apparently guns don't kill people, videogames do.

Dec. 21 2012 11:22 AM

Let's create an NRA free Congress zone.

Dec. 21 2012 11:22 AM
tim from nyc

the problem with arming our schools is overly simplistic.
shooting a person is a hell of a thing to do. regardless of who is being shot.
so the idea would be to arm people that are charged with caring for youth to shoot a young person?

Dec. 21 2012 11:22 AM
Dorothy from Manhattan

OK - So let's say we give a gun to every teacher. The gunman in Newtown and in Aurora were wearing heavy gun-proof armor (not sure if that's what you call it). And nobody (including Robert Siegel on NPR) ever mentions that. So what good will it do if we give a gun to every teacher and every 8 year old kid.

I'm so d@mn sick of the NRA and the gun people.

Dec. 21 2012 11:22 AM
antonio from bayside

I actually thought the NRA was going to say something profound, considering the time it took to prepare something. Who wrote this? Ted Nugent?

Dec. 21 2012 11:22 AM
The Truth from Becky

Irresponsible gun nuts!!

Dec. 21 2012 11:21 AM

So their answer is more actual, physical, lethal guns, while blaming fictional guns for the problem?

And why did he keep citing the hurricane and natural disasters? What did that have to do with anything? I don't recall reports of armed vigilantes patrolling downtown Manhattan last month. (And would that be a good or a bad thing in his books, anyway?)

Dec. 21 2012 11:21 AM
Zach from Brooklyn

What was it La Pierre said about "we have an unknown number of literal monsters in our society"?

Be afraid of monsters. That is why we need guns. Literal monsters.

Dec. 21 2012 11:21 AM
Hal from Crown Heights

Lapierre: What a sad, paranoid person. How frightening that he is the leader of gun fundamentalists.

Dec. 21 2012 11:20 AM
phillip from bklyn

I too can't believe what I'm hearing. Please, Brian, don't stay objective here. Tell any listener of yours to please oppose the NRA. And to ask themselves, would you have wanted to go to an armed school? And what is mental illness that he would like to have recorded in a database? Every kid on Prozac, Ritalin? He is selling guns with his every word. What a bastard.

Dec. 21 2012 11:20 AM
CBrown from Brooklyn

I sort of have to admire LaPierre's brass in doubling down. And he has even introduced a new bogeyman: hurricanes! Another hurricane, and civilization will collapse! I assume that this means the NRA will become a leading advocate to combat climate change?

Dec. 21 2012 11:20 AM
Nick from UWS

I must say that I agree with this man completely about the level of sickness and violence that passes for "entertainment" today, the video games, the movies, the TV shows...all of it, putrid crap foisted on today's youth by infantile psychologically damaged children in the entertainment industry.. I agree with him.

Dec. 21 2012 11:19 AM
Ann in NYC from Manhattan

The hideous fear mongering continues. How to stop this powerful group? It's so upsetting. So distressing that politicians won't act, that the people won't stand up to these crazies. What to do?

Dec. 21 2012 11:18 AM
Morgan from Manhattan

What a simple minded argument by the NRA: Arm our schools. Great for gun sales but...

#1. How many schools would we need to arm?
#2 The problem is "Why do these sick people attack children?" Lets solve that problem.

Haven't we gotten beyond this society of fear. This man makes me sick to my stomach, literally. Nauseous.

Dec. 21 2012 11:18 AM
Nancy from Manhattan

The HYPOCRISY of the NRA is breathtaking. They say it's people, not guns, that kill people, but now they're blaming video games?! Video games don't kill people, people shooting bullets out of guns at other people kill people.

Dec. 21 2012 11:17 AM
sp from nyc

I don't know whether to scream or cry--get him off the air!

Dec. 21 2012 11:17 AM
Judith from Brooklyn

Disgusting....NRA's message is let's encourage MORE violence in our society. Blaming everything/everyone else but the assault-weapon mentality fostered by the NRA. If you're looking for filth, it's this message.

Dec. 21 2012 11:17 AM
Chris from Manhattan

The point that the NRA is missing is that we need armed guards b/c of the proliferation of guns thanks to their strangle hold on the legislative process. If we reduce access to guns we won't need to have armed guards at sports events, etc.

LaPierre's comments are self-serving and not taking any responsibility. He's pointing fingers at videos. What he fails to acknowledge is that it's all part of the same problem of which he and his organization are the nexus.

Shame on the NRA. Have they no decency?

Dec. 21 2012 11:16 AM
els from ridgefield, ct

My insides are quivering at the words I'm hearing. When will we stop letting fear control the issues?
When in doubt, put the children first - you'll come up with the right answer.

Dec. 21 2012 11:16 AM
Truth & Beauty from Brooklyn

I think Wayne LaPierre is the monster. I absolutely cannot believe that after all the carnage we have suffered in this country from gun violence he would be advocating guns in schools. Whatever happened to "beating our swords into plowshares" and "ain't gonna study war no more?"

The NRA is part of the problem, NOT part of the solution.

Dec. 21 2012 11:15 AM
sp from nyc

Why are you giving this murderous, self-serving, greedy jerk airtime?

Dec. 21 2012 11:15 AM
Nick from UWS

So I see...this idiot from the NRA wants the entire world to be an armed camp. Not the slightest consideration to removing super-lethal firearms from society. So far he wants the US to be an armed camp, a Big Brother database of the mentally ill...this guy is insane.

Dec. 21 2012 11:14 AM
Nancy from Manhattan

What a shock, the NRA's answer to gun violence is more guns. The blood is dripping, splashing, pouring off their hands.

Dec. 21 2012 11:11 AM

im sickened

Dec. 21 2012 11:11 AM

This NRA statement is making me sick as is Marin Chuzzlewit.

Dec. 21 2012 11:11 AM
tim from nyc

brian - what do you mean *even* republicans?
i'm definitively centrist and associate and debate with both dems and reps.
*every*single*one*of*them* are pro gun control.
only the most rabid agenda is anti gun control.

Dec. 21 2012 11:10 AM

Martin Chuzzlewit
sounds like u went to school in 1930s germany?!

Dec. 21 2012 10:53 AM
Ruth from Manhattan

BBC world news had a report about people in CT buying guns.
They believe more guns will keep them safe.
I know that they are victims of far right brainwashing, but
I am so angry and hurt by this. Every thinking, feeling person should be.

This is deliberate and heartless salt in the wounds of these innocent families.

Dec. 21 2012 10:12 AM
Martin Chuzzlewit from Manhattan

Enough with this story!! Why do we ignore a much bigger, ongoing tragedy…..thousands of murders in big cities every year? INVOLUNTARY STERILIZATION is surely Bloomberg’s next idea.

Let’s remember that there have been 5,000(!) murders in New York City thus far during Mayor Bloomberg’s mayoralty, even with the laudable, much reduced rate. So why isn’t Nanny Mike pushing involuntary sterilization after one allowed child for “single moms” (don’t you just love that cuddly term for an urban nightmare?) in places like The Bronx (a 70% out-of-wedlock birthrate in the boro), Harlem, Bed-Stuy and other murder palaces? The Freakonomics authors linked legal abortion- related declines in births to unprepared mothers to the murder rate decreases in the last 20 years. Hey, Mike, why go after suburban gun shows when NYC girls are churning out 3, 4, 5 or more undisciplined hooligans? That’s where the really big numbers are ripe for your intervention.

Dec. 21 2012 08:44 AM

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.