Streams

Analysis: Ethics of Media Withholding Information About Kidnapped Journalists

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Syrians inspect damage at the site of a car bomb on the southeastern outskirts of the Syrian capital. Syrians inspect damage at the site of a car bomb on the southeastern outskirts of the Syrian capital. (JOSEPH EID/AFP/GettyImages)

This morning we found out that Richard Engel, the chief foreign correspondent for NBC News, and his TV crew were released after spending five days in captivity in Syria.

Most people did not know they had been kidnapped because NBC, the other major television networks, and papers like the New York Times agreed not to report on the situation until the journalists were safe. 

"These are very difficult decisions for news organizations and their executives and journalists," says Bob Steele, a scholar at the Poynter Institute and director of the Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. 

Steele joins Amy Eddings for a discussion of the ethics of the press withholding information from the public, especially information about journalists kidnapped overseas.  

 

Guests:

Bob Steele

Hosted by:

Amy Eddings

Produced by:

Javier Guzman and Daniel P. Tucker

Tags:

More in:

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.

Sponsored

Latest Newscast

 

 

Support

WNYC is supported by the Charles H. Revson Foundation: Because a great city needs an informed and engaged public

Feeds

Supported by