Streams

Healthy Cooking for Children

Monday, December 17, 2012

Diane Harris Brown, Director of Educational and Community Programming at the James Beard Foundation, Leslie Bushara Deputy Director for Education and Guest Services at the Children's Museum of Manhattan, and chef Jehangir Mehta talk about healthy cooking for kids during the holidays, and the Children's Museum’s Family Chef series.

Guests:

Diane Harris Brown, Leslie Bushara and Jehangir Mehta

Comments [14]

http://teamnutrition.usda.gov

yup check it out, great listerv, not at all evil , "thatgirl"

Dec. 17 2012 10:54 PM
luci from NYC

i work with parents who'd like to cook woth their kids and have their kids to have (actually love) vegetables and plant based diet! www.escalateyuorhealth.com, let's connect!

Dec. 17 2012 06:11 PM
thatgirl from manhattan

Good point, Lucy! How can an adult expect to raise a child with an adventurous palate when they can't let go their own limitations?

Given the outsized portions of most restaurants, I can imagine splitting an "adult" entree with a child is a good way forward. My husband and I split them between us!

Dec. 17 2012 01:33 PM
Ramaswamy

I believe the reason that vegetarian eating is so unpopular in the U.S. is because most veg fare here is just plain raw cauliflower, or lettuce or brocolli etc. It is true- most vegetables are not too satisfying when eaten raw.

The reason why nearly a billion people in India thrive on vegetarian food is that they cook the vegetables in creative ways, in combination with lentils etc. and with spices. Until Americans learn to cook vegetarian food, it will continue to be unpopular.

Dec. 17 2012 01:31 PM
Susan L Roberts from Flushing, NY

I love this show! I work with children, parents and therapists to help children develop a love of eating healthy foods. I've written a book called, "My Kid Eats Everything: a Journey from Picky to Adventurous Eating" that helps parents (and therapists) follow simple steps to encourage children to try new foods. I work with children who have autism - they can walk away from the table meal after meal if they don't see the EXACT food they like. I follow Ellyn Satter's model of Eating Competence - which shares responsibility for eating: parents get to be "the boss" of what foods to serve at meals, when to serve meals, how to behave at mealtimes; children get to be "the boss" of their own bodies - they decide IF they will eat and how much. The kinds of suggestions your guests have shared all work within this structure to get even the toughest picky eaters begin to explore new foods and eventually discover the ones they like.

Dec. 17 2012 01:28 PM
Lucy from CT

I was frequently frustrated when dining out with our kids (when they were younger) that the children's menu offerings were only chicken fingers or hamburgers. My daughter's favorite food at the age of 8 was "rack of lamb"! We shouldn't "dumb down" food for kids. I often find that friends of my children are actually more willing to try a new food than their parents.

Dec. 17 2012 01:26 PM
thatgirl from manhattan

Vlad - I know a lot of toddlers who like sushi--probably because their parents started them on more "adult" food options early, rather than feeding them the usual "child-friendly"/manufactured pablum. There's a lot to be said for a return to a family collectively eating the same thing, rather than catering to individual or "safe" options. Growing up, we ate what adults ate--whether it was herring, beets or whatever was laid before us. Our parents didn't entertain much whining.

Dec. 17 2012 01:23 PM

Starting Kids early...

I never liked Sushi.. I would have one, when pressed.. but that's it. My son and his wife love Sushi and all Oriental and Eastern foods. They now have a daughter (she is 3) and take her out to eat with them as often as possible. The last time my wife and I went out with them, they ordered Sushi as an appetizer... when the first plate of Sushi was delivered, my granddaughter immediately grabbed it and polished off all 8 pieces before we could blink. Is it common for kids that young to LOVE Sushi so much?

Dec. 17 2012 01:22 PM
Vlad from Central, NJ

Starting Kids early...

I never liked Sushi.. I would have one, when pressed.. but that's it. My son and his wife love Sushi and all Oriental and Eastern foods. They now have a daughter (she is 3) and take her out to eat with them as often as possible. The last time my wife and I went out with them, they ordered Sushi as an appetizer... when the first plate of Sushi was delivered, my granddaughter immediately grabbed it and polished off all 8 pieces before we could blink. Is it common for kids that young to LOVE Sushi so much?

Dec. 17 2012 01:18 PM
paula from South Plainfield

My 2 year old is super picky eater and wouldn't anything but he loves to drink. So I invested in good blender and make smoothies for him every day. I put the most nutritious vegetables, fruits, nuts etc and he loves it. I don't know how he would survive without them!

Dec. 17 2012 01:17 PM
Oshinsky

How do you introduce spicy food into a kids diet?

Dec. 17 2012 01:16 PM
Truth & Beauty from Brooklyn

I have a nephew who absolutely refused to eat any kind of vegetables when he was young. I found a deli near where I live that makes fried cauliflower that looks, tastes and crunches exactly like fried chicken. I bought some for all three nephews, who happened to be with me at the time, but told them they were "nuggets" - not what kind of nuggets, just nuggets. The nephew who refused to eat vegetables tried them thinking they were chicken nuggets, loved them, keeps eating them and to this day we've never told him he wasn't eating chicken. One of these centuries, we'll spill the beans. Meanwhile, we got him to eat a vegetable.

Dec. 17 2012 01:15 PM
thatgirl from manhattan

The USDA, who support factory farming, pesticides and GMOs have "wonderful resources?" Who knew?

Dec. 17 2012 01:09 PM
superf88

Great subject of course.
But by focusing solely on nutrition, OR exercise, OR "environmental awareness"/Organic farming, OR community, etc. , it seems that health-minded folks are unnecessarily disjointing subjects that ought to be naturally associated and even taught at the same time.

Do any of your guests connect healthy eating with any of these other elements of a healthy life, in their teachings and interactions? And can they mention how food might be used to promote a healthier life in a holistic sense that goes beyond simply taste and personal nutrition?

Incidentally -- The usda also has some wonderful resources for getting kids to eat healthy, including healthy cookbooks, listservs, certifications, etc. found here:

http://teamnutrition.usda.gov

Dec. 17 2012 12:45 PM

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