Streams

Manhattan Lures the Newest New Yorkers

Thursday, December 06, 2012

The newest New Yorkers are doing pretty well and many of them are moving into high-priced parts of Manhattan, like the West Village, Tribeca and midtown, mostly from other states.

According to the American Community Survey, "the most detailed portrait of America's towns and neighborhoods" issued by the U.S. Census Bureau, many of New York City's newest residents are settling in Manhattan. For instance, more than 20 percent of the new residents in a census tract centered around University Place and 12th Street, near Union Square, moved to the neighborhood from another state. 

(Map: Move your cursor over different neighborhoods to see how many people moved in and how many moved out.)

But a lot of people are arriving in Manhattan from other countries — they're moving into midtown and the East Village, as well as Morningside Heights, where Columbia University's located.

Outside of Manhattan, a few areas drew many of the newcomers — especially Dumbo and Bay Ridge, in Brooklyn, but also Hillcrest and Flushing in Queens. More than a fifth of a section of Grasmere, on the north shore of Staten Island, moved there from another state.

However, large sections of Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx saw hardly any new residents move in from outside the city.

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Comments [10]

3genNYCite from Brooklyn

The new New Yokers are sucking the authenticity of real generational neighborhoods and making them into empty politically correct sterile white enclaves where they ,the outsiders,tell us how we should look,fell,act and think.

Feb. 17 2013 03:45 AM
alexis from UES

I moved here about a year ago and agree that prices are crazy. However, thats the price you pay for living in the greatest city in the world. Here are some tips for anyone thinking of moving here: http://www.bettertopic.com/2012/12/28/15-knew-moving-nyc/

Dec. 28 2012 11:53 AM

While I agree that prices in the city are ridiculous, I'd argue against the idea that the homogenization of the culture is entirely the fault of wealthy newcomers to NYC, and to pin the blame on them is to explain a national (indeed, global) trend with a much more localized shift in demographics. The rest of the country has also been filled with Starbuckses and Chipotles, from big cities to po-dunk little towns. Is there a correlation? Sure! But not necessarily causation.

Dec. 07 2012 12:37 PM
Joey Dern

Dude that makes a whole lot of sense dude.

www.IP-Hiding.tk

Dec. 06 2012 04:31 PM
El

I am pretty curious about what the actual data behind this is - I moved to NYC for college (yes, at NYU!), stayed in Manhattan for a few years after graduation, and then moved to Brooklyn Heights. I got my NY State residency right after graduation, so would my move to Brooklyn have counted as an out of state resident moving there?

Also, what's with the random patches of red in, say, South Ozone Park?

@Inquisigal "And is it perhaps more indicative of the newcomers' naivete of the rest of New York City - as opposed to the fact they they are "doing well" - that made them choose the most high-profile areas of Manhattan to settle in?"

I would say yes - based on the non-New Yorkers I know, I'd say this is a bigger factor than some might guess. You'd be surprised how many people still think NYC hasn't changed since the '80s; I've had people ask if it was safe where I live (in Brooklyn Heights! The most they're in danger of is getting run into by some old lady's walker)

Also, if you move to NYC for work, you're most likely to work in Manhattan, and most people don't see a reason to suffer a long commute if they can afford not to.

Dec. 06 2012 12:46 PM
BF from NYC

>The ever growing population of New York University and New School students has also contributed negatively by the students' regard for the city as merely a place to get drunk on the street, as if it is one large frat-house. The universities themselves have taken up too much space and rental properties.< This comment is oh so true. The city really is more about consumption than about the creation of culture. I miss the 70s.

Dec. 06 2012 12:04 PM
eastvillage from east village

The wealth that has been reaped by the very small minority of the world and the country that has settled here, the kind of real estate development policy that has been championed in this city over the last 12 years, the systematic erosion of rent stabilized apartments by policy and landlord illegal practices, these are just some of the reasons/causes that has transformed Manhattan into an increasingly economic homogenized population of elite people. The city's character has been transformed into a bland landscape of chain stores and people who regard the city as temporary residence and/or a place to engage in real estate speculation. The city is no longer a place for the outsider, the artist, the non-academically employed intellectual, the person who just wants to live among diverse folks. The ever growing population of New York University and New School students has also contributed negatively by the students' regard for the city as merely a place to get drunk on the street, as if it is one large frat-house. The universities themselves have taken up too much space and rental properties. All in all, the city is less interesting than it was even 15 years ago. So sad that wealth has such destructive impact on culture.

Dec. 06 2012 11:38 AM
Inquisigal from Brooklyn

Agree with my fellow skeptics commenting on this piece; this is a rather broad brush with which to make such a proclamation, American Community Survey. How many of these newcomers - I wonder - are paying their own rent? What industries do they work in? Are they indeed "doing well" or has that only been inferred based on their zip code and real estate comps for those areas? How many are 4-member families or young adults are packed into a small 1 bedrooms in the Village, or a multi-generation families packed into a 2 bedroom? And is it perhaps more indicative of the newcomers' naivete of the rest of New York City - as opposed to the fact they they are "doing well" - that made them choose the most high-profile areas of Manhattan to settle in? Do these people leave these neighborhoods after they realize how ripped off they are getting in the amount of space they are getting for their dollars? What is the percentage of newcomers who have been in NYC for 5 years who wake up and smell the coffee and move to other neighborhoods and boroughs?

Either way, no one should be happy that the cost of housing just keeps going up, up, up.

Dec. 06 2012 09:54 AM
alex

Nobody is moving to 'Morningside Hights where the Columbia University is located'. Newcomers is moving to the West Harlem where the Northern part of the Columbia University is developing and to the South Harlem: on and around 8 ave/Frederic Douglass Boulevard (about 5-10 min walk from Columbia campus). Do not mislead people.
Does NY Times now an advertising agency for some Real Estate brokers?

Dec. 06 2012 09:02 AM
Ana

Sure, the new new New Yorkers must doing well, otherwise they couldn't afford the move to NY.

Dec. 06 2012 07:26 AM

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