Streams

Mantegna to Matisse at the Frick Collection

Thursday, December 06, 2012

Colin Bailey, Deputy Director and Chief Curator of the Frick Collection, discusses the exhibition Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery. It features 58 drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, London, that show extraordinary drawings made between the late Middle Ages and the early 20 century by artists including Mantegna, da Vinci, Dürer, Rubens, Rembrandt Goya, Turner, Degas, Paul Cézanne, van Gogh, Seurat, Matisse, and Picasso.

© The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London
Andrea Mantegna (c. 1431–1506). Studies for Christ at the Column (recto), early 1460s

Pen and brown ink
9.3 x 5.7 inches
From Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, on view at the Frick Collection through January 27, 2013

© The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London
Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519). Studies for Saint Mary Magdalene, c. 1480–82

Pen and brown ink
5.4 x 3.1 inches
From Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, on view at the Frick Collection through January 27, 2013

© The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London
Parmigianino (1503–1540). Woman Seated on the Ground, c. 1523–24

Black chalk and white gouache on light brown tinted paper
9 x 6.9 inches
From Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, on view at the Frick Collection through January 27, 2013

© The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London
Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475–1564). The Dream (Il Sogno), c. 1533

Black chalk
15.6 x 11 inches
From Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, on view at the Frick Collection through January 27, 2013

© The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London
Pieter Bruegel the Elder (1525–1569). Kermis at Hoboken, 1559

Pen and brown ink, contours incised for transfer
10.4 x 15.5 inches
From Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, on view at the Frick Collection through January 27, 2013

© The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London
Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775–1851). Dawn After the Wreck, c. 1841

Watercolor, gouache, and touches of red chalk with some rubbing out and scraping
9.9 x 14.5 inches
From Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, on view at the Frick Collection through January 27, 2013

© The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London
Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640). Helena Fourment, c. 1630–31

Black, red, and white chalk (retouched with pen and brown ink in some details of the head and headdress)
24 x 21.7 inches
From Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, on view at the Frick Collection through January 27, 2013

© The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London
Jean-Antoine Watteau (1684–1721). Satyr Pouring Wine, 1717

Black, red and white chalk
11.2 x 8.3 inches
From Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, on view at the Frick Collection through January 27, 2013

© The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London
Georges Seurat (1859–1891). Female Nude, c. 1879–81

Black Conté crayon over stumped graphite
24.9 x 19 inches
From Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, on view at the Frick Collection through January 27, 2013

© The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London
Paul Cézanne (1839–1906). Apples, Bottle and Chairback, c. 1904–6

Graphite and watercolor on wove paper
18 x 23.8 inches
From Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, on view at the Frick Collection through January 27, 2013

Guests:

Colin Bailey
News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Comments [1]

With regard to drawings, a Raphael just went for $48 million at auction in London — zounds!

Dec. 06 2012 12:42 PM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.