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Watch our 1913 Videos

Thursday, November 01, 2012 - 12:00 AM

Videos with Sara Fishko and guests for "Culture Shock 1913"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Touring MoMA for Masterpieces from 1913

WNYC's Sara Fishko gets a private tour of some of the paintings and sculptures from 1913 in MoMA's collection, some on display and others unearthed from a storage closet. Her guide is Ann Temkin, the Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art.

 

 

A Brief Tour of the Arthur B. Davies Collection
Sara Fishko visits Niles Davies' farm house. Davies is the last living descendant of Arthur B. Davies, one of three artists who were largely responsible for conceiving and producing the notorious Armory Show of 1913 that introduced Cubism to America for the first time.

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Comments [2]

Ira Wolfman from New York

I find that radio is a wonderful medium for describing a visual subject. It stimulates my imagination and leads me to seek out the visuals after having had my own images evoked.

As for your comment, Richard Schultz, you probably know by now that there is an exhibit at the New-York Historical Society that brings together a good number of pieces from the 1913 Armory show. It runs till February 23, 2014. Info here http://www.nyhistory.org/exhibitions/armory-show-at-100

You can see much of the artwork at http://armory.nyhistory.org/category/artworks/

Dec. 28 2013 04:51 PM
richard schultz from Vermont

A strange idea to do a radio show about a subject that is visual.
Has anyone thought of getting the items together that were in the original show so we can see what the 1913 show looked like ?
I went to Moholy Nagy's school in Chicago so all this is my religion for life.

Jan. 07 2013 09:19 PM

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