Streams

Spinning Around

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Monday, November 19, 2012

Ben Ferguson in a scene from PigPen Theatre Co.’s "The Old Man and The Old Moon," at The Gym at Judson. (Photo credit: Joan Marcus.)

Craig Whitney examines America’s relationship with guns and looks at the history of the Second Amendment and the gun control movement. Aman Sethi talks about poverty in Delhi. We’ll find out about “The Old Man and the Old Moon,” a play that combines original music, shadow puppetry, live action, and lighting effects. And Sean Wilentz gives an account of the rich history of Columbia Records.

A Liberal’s Case for the Second Amendment

Veteran New York Times editor Craig Whitney reexamines America’s relationship with guns and looking at the ways guns are part of American culture. In Living with Guns: A Liberal’s Case for the Second Amendment he makes the case that trying to restrict gun ownership doesn’t effectively deter crime and argues that, if we focus on controlling violence rather than guns themselves, the Second Amendment may not be as lethal as the left would like to think.

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Life and Death in Delhi

Aman Sethi tells the story of the life of Mohammed Ashraf, who studied biology, became a butcher, a tailor, and an electrician’s apprentice, but ended up a homeless day laborer in old Delhi, in India. Sethi’s book A Free Man: A True Story of Life and Death in Delhi is portrait of persistence in the face of poverty in one of the world’s largest cities.

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"The Old Man and the Old Moon"

Ryan Melia, who plays the lead in “The Old Man and the Old Moon,” Dan Weschler, who plays a variety of roles, the accordion, and was involved in composing the music and writing the script; and Lydia Fine, set, costume, and puppet designer, discuss the PigPen Theatre Co.’s Off-Broadway play, which features PigPen’s signature blend of original music, shadow puppetry, live action, and lighting effects. “The Old Man and the Old Moon” is playing through January 6, 2013 at The Gym at Judson.

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The Columbia Records Story

Historian Sean Wilentz talks about the rich history of Columbia Records, and how the label combined technical and social change to create of some of the greatest albums ever made. In 360 Sound: The Columbia Records Story, he tells how Columbia nurtured the careers of legends such as Bessie Smith, Frank Sinatra, Barbra Streisand, Miles Davis, Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Bruce Springsteen, Beyoncé, and many more.

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