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Lasting Impression

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Monday, November 05, 2012

Chrystia Freeland talks about growing economic inequality and the rise of the global super-rich. We’ll look at how photography was manipulated before the advent of Photoshop. Andy Borowitz talks about the Presidential election. Plus, we’ll look at the story behind Leonardo da Vinci and "The Last Supper."

Chrystia Freeland on Plutocrats

Chrystia Freeland, business journalist who has spent almost 20 year reporting on the new elite, examines wealth disparity and income inequality. Her book Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super-Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else dissects the lives of the world’s wealthiest individuals.

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"Faking It" at the Metropolitan Museum

Curator Mia Fineman talks about the exhibition Faking It: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop, on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through January 27, 2013. The exhibition traces the history of manipulated photography from the 1840s through the early 1990s, when the computer replaced manual techniques as the dominant means of doctoring photographs.

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The Borowitz Report

Andy Borowitz, author of the Borowitz Report on NewYorker.com, is back to share his thoughts on tomorrow's presidential election and the long campaign.

Watch a video of Andy Borowitz talk about the election—and predicting who will win—at the 92nd Street Y.

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Leonardo and the Last Supper

In 1495 in Milan, Leonardo da Vinci began working on what would become one of the most influential and beloved works of art-The Last Supper. Ross King explores how-amid war and the political and religious turmoil, and beset by his own insecurities and frustrations-Leonardo created the masterpiece that would forever define him. in Leonardo and the Last Supper, King presents an original portrait of one of the world's greatest geniuses through the lens of his most famous work. 

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