Streams

Sandy Call-In Special with Amy Eddings

Saturday, November 03, 2012

Scenes from Hurricane Sandy

Saturday from 2-4pm (and re-airing from 6-8), the WNYC newsroom brings you special coverage of Sandy and its aftermath, hosted by Amy Eddings. Call 646-829-3980 to take part!

Sandy Resources: Transit Tracker | Volunteering | Questions, Answered | Traffic Map | WNYC News Home

Featuring:

  • Latest News Updates on gas, power, transit, and emergency aid from the WNYC newsroom
  • Who Stepped Up? Your calls highlighting those who rose to the ocassion during Sandy and in the days since
  • Cleanup Advice Your cleanup questions answered with industrial hygienist Monona Rossol
  • -- Information on MOMA efforts to clean damaged artwork
  • Our Waterways A check-in on the state of the Hudson River with Riverkeeper's Phillip Musegass
  • Marathon Cancelled How did public pressure play a part - what do you think of the decision?
  • Delivering Gas to the Region An explainer on how NY and NJ are getting gas to local residents
  • Who Helped You, Who Are You Helping? Calls on how you are coming together, and what comes next

Hosted by:

Amy Eddings

More in:

Comments [7]

Smokey from LES

You and others at WNYC keep talking about the long lines at gas stations in New Jersey. It's not just New Jersey - it's here in New York City (not so much in Manhattan but long lines in Queens) and huge lines all over Long Island. Thanks!

Nov. 07 2012 06:57 PM
Ralphem from Jersey shore

Amy Eddings let the first spokesman for the oil distributors have way too long a leash as he pontificated that we, the public, are responsible for the "panic" shortage of gasoline in NY/NJ. The entire oil industry, including this guy and his lobbying organization, have virtually ignored the possibility of a severe disruption in gasoline supplies due to lack of electricity, generators, trucking, or whatever. This oversight is the cause of "panic" buying, since no developed area can go for 5 days without gasoline distribution. Amy seemed to agree with him wholeheartedly and let him ramble on by deflecting the blame onto our shoulders. WNYC has been superb on the air this week, but this was weak journalism and pandering by this oil industry mouthpiece. The obscene profits of the oil companies have been at the expense of accepting responsibility for the effective distribution of this essential product in emergency circumstances.

Nov. 03 2012 06:16 PM

Just heard the expert's segment...I was on hold to speak to him and my phone battery died!

It's no news that there is no real absolute supply shortage. This is a distribution bottleneck due to lack of power to run pumps etc.

But the experts line was uncredible. This still smells like a pretext to raise the prices...which is what I predict will happen. It's ALREADY HAPPENING at the pumps.

Yet there is NO real shortage.

http://www.nasdaq.com/article/oil-futures-gasoline-volatile-amid-evolving-view-of-sandys-impact-20121031-01456#.UJV4crR_h94

Let's hope the volatility settles down...meanwhile people who are really out of gas are stranded...and a few gas stations are making a killing.

Bottom lines: We need backup generators in gas stations and we need back up generators at all storage and distribution facilities.....AND we need political leaders who will quell this kind of panic rather than fuel it for political gain as it makes them look heroic/in charge when what they're really doing is exploiting and exacerbating fears.

What Enron did to California must never happen again!

Nov. 03 2012 04:10 PM
fuva from harlemworld

I agree with the cancellation of the Marathon. But I don't think it was an easy decision; many people were conflicted about it.

What has annoyed me the most, however, is that Bloomberg -- "the decider" -- didn't make the announcement. This seems cowardly. It's like the naked emperor didn't want to acknowledge his (human) misjudgment in public.

Nov. 03 2012 03:56 PM

Part 2 of 2

What's needed is an immediate use of emergency powers of eminent domain to TOTALY oversee what this industry is doing and to SERIOUSLY expedite the repair process.

MILLIONS of people have had their power restored in the last five days! Underwater tunnels have been pumped out! Dangling cranes have been secured and plans made to build another crane on that roof. Trans all over the region have been put online after clearing and testing tracks.

Yet this industry is incapable of repairing some fuel lines from a port? Exactly HOW was/is the port "damaged"? Let's get the feds involved in getting it fixed up FAST!!! And the same applies to the pumping facilities at the storage locations!!!

And if it turns out that anyone in the industry has sabotaged the equipment to create a crisis then those individuals need to spend long stretches in prison on TERRORISM charges!!!

I now this sounds cynical but I don't trust this industry. They do NOT have the interests of human beings at heart. It's all about maximizing profit for them. That's their "job".

Also commodity trading in gasoline needs to be suspended and the price fixed at current levels. NO ONE should be making windfall profits off this disaster!!! NO ONE!!! Better to have rationing for as long as it takes to get o normal.

In NJ there is a law against individual gas stations gouging....but there's no law against wealthy powerful traders manipulating the markets and making massive killings off of potential price spikes.

Obviously this is a complex matter as there is often a conflict between what is morally right and logically sensible/practical and maximizing profits. Greed creates perverse motivations for things to be screwed.

Naomi Klein wrote on what she called "The Shock Doctrine/Disaster Capitalism......the current situation fits that mold. I would love to be totally wrong. Let's see how long it takes to clear up the distribution bottlenecks and for the prices to get back to where they were before.

Last week I could buy gas in Hackensack NJ for 3.29 cash for regular.....let's see if we ever get to that level any time soon.

Nov. 03 2012 02:38 PM

Part 2

What's needed is an immediate use of emergency powers of eminent domain to TOTALY oversee what this industry is doing and to SERIOUSLY expedite the repair process.

MILLIONS of people have had their power restored in the last five days! Underwater tunnels have been pumped out! Dangling cranes have been secured and plans made to build another crane on that roof. Trans all over the region have been put online after clearing and testing tracks.

Yet this industry is incapable of repairing some fuel lines from a port? Exactly HOW was/is the port "damaged"? Let's get the feds involved in getting it fixed up FAST!!! And the same applies to the pumping facilities at the storage locations!!!

And if it turns out that anyone in the industry has sabotaged the equipment to create a crisis then those individuals need to spend long stretches in prison on TERRORISM charges!!!

I now this sounds cynical but I don't trust this industry. They do NOT have the interests of human beings at heart. It's all about maximizing profit for them. That's their "job".

Also commodity trading in gasoline needs to be suspended and the price fixed at current levels. NO ONE should be making windfall profits off this disaster!!! NO ONE!!! Better to have rationing for as long as it takes to get o normal.

In NJ there is a law against individual gas stations gouging....but there's no law against wealthy powerful traders manipulating the markets and making massive killings off of potential price spikes.

Obviously this is a complex matter as there is often a conflict between what is morally right and logically sensible/practical and maximizing profits. Greed creates perverse motivations for things to be screwed.

Naomi Klein wrote on what she called "The Shock Doctrine/Disaster Capitalism......the current situation fits that mold. I would love to be totally wrong. Let's see how long it takes to clear up the distribution bottlenecks and for the prices to get back to where they were before.

Last week I could buy gas in Hackensack NJ for 3.29 cash for regular.....let's see if we ever get to that level any time soon.

Nov. 03 2012 02:36 PM

There are many stories about the genesis of the current crisis of gasoline supplies.

The stations with no power can't pump out the gas sitting in their tanks.

The delivery trucks can't make it through the debris blocking the roads (this is no longer true).

The ports are damaged, as well as the pipelines bringing fuel to storage depots.

The depots have been damaged by the storm.

The refinery had damage from the storm.

All of this is taken at the word of the petrochemical industry.

Why aren't there emergency generators being sent to all the gas stations with no power so the fuel sitting there can be used?

Why hasn't fema sent INDEPENDENT experts to document and oversee the EXACT DETAILS regarding the alleged damage...and the DETAILS re what EXACTLY is being done to EXPEDITIOUSLY make repairs.

WHy are we trusting an industry with all manner of perverse incentives to drive up prices by exploiting short term bottlenecks in the supply chain in such a way that all their existing supplies and future commodity contracts become more valuable if they can just create more fear and more desperation to the point where people will gladly pay four or even five bucks a gallon just to be able to get to work or to the doctor or to shop.

If that sounds overly cynical I refer you to the sorry history of Enron. That's EXACTLY what they did to the state of California!!! They created a massive period of windfall profits by taking advantage of supply bottlenecks and exacerbating fear.

Part 2 follows


Nov. 03 2012 02:35 PM

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