Streams

New Jersey Issues Water Advisory, Restrictions

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

A boil water advisory has been issued for several municipalities in New Jersey, as the state continues to cope with the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Water-use restrictions statewide  having also been ordered to aid conservation amid possible shortages after superstorm Sandy.

Health Commissioner Mary O’Dowd said state, county and local officials are monitoring water quality carefully.

“Disruptions to water supply treatment due to power outages and flooding can lead to serious health issues,” said Commissioner O’Dowd. “It’s important that our residents continue to stay informed so they can take measures to protect themselves and their families.”

The state has set up at 211 system to answer questions about food and water safety. You can also call 1-866-324-0964. Public health officials will be available 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on weekdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends.

Additionally, Governor Chris Christie has signed an executive order on a state wide mandatory water restriction. It includes no washing of pavements, no lawn watering and no washing of cars. He also encouraged people to take shorter showers.

The 12 municipalities and water companies have instituted boil water advisories for all or parts of their communities:

They include:

  • Atlantic City MUA
  • New Brunswick Water Department
  • Independence MUA - Highland System, Warren County
  • Bayview Water System, Fortesque, Downe Township, Cumberland County
  • Ship Bottom, Ocean County
  • Stafford Township MUA, Cedar Bonnet Island, Ocean County
  • United Water Sunset Ridge, Vernon Township, Sussex County
  • United Water Highlands Lakes, Vernon Township
  • United Water Predmore, Vernon Township
  • United Water Sammis, Vernon Township
  • United Water Woodridge Wantage, Sussex County
  • Brant Beach, Ocean County

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