Streams

Christopher Walken on "A Late Quartet"

Tuesday, November 06, 2012

Christopher Walken talks about his role in the new film “A Late Quartet.” He plays the cellist of a world-renowned string quartet. When he receives a life changing diagnosis, the group's future suddenly hangs in the balance. “A Late Quartet” is playing at Lincoln Plaza Cinemas at the Sunshine Landmark Cinemas.

Guests:

Christopher Walken
News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Comments [3]

Pamela Quinn

The woman Christopher Walken is talking about who helped him with his PD is Pamela Quinn. She's had PD for 18 years and is a dancer as well. She is listening to the interview now!

Nov. 06 2012 01:25 PM
Robin Anthony Elliott from Executive Director, Parkinson's Disease Foundation, NY, NY

The Parkinson's Disease Foundation (PDF) hears from people living with Parkinson's that the disease is often misunderstood -- for example, mistaken for drunkenness. We would like to ask Mr. Walken, how did you -- and the actor who played your doctor who diagnosed your Parkinson's -- prepare for the role? Do you think the film will help people understand what it is like to live with a chronic disease like Parkinson's, and raise awareness of Parkinson's disease overall?

Additionally, PDF estimates that as many as one million Americans live with Parkinson's, but millions more family members also live with the impact of the disease. Can you comment on how the quartet sort of represents that family to Peter, and how the other three members felt the impact of the Parkinson's diagnosis on their own lives?

Robin Anthony Elliott, Executive Director, Parkinson's Disease Foundation

Nov. 06 2012 10:02 AM
Rhoda from Upper East Side

Leonard, please have the courtesy to pronounce Chris's last name correctly, WAL-ken.

Nov. 06 2012 06:21 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.