Streams

Barclays Center Architects

Tuesday, October 02, 2012

The Barclays Center in Brooklyn (Courtesy of SHoP Architects)

The new Nets arena in Brooklyn is drawing a range of reviews. Architects Gregg Pasquarelli and Chris Sharples of SHoP discuss their design of the Barclays Center and how it fared on its first weekend open for business.

→ Barclay's Review Roundup: Alexandra Lange (The New Yorker) | Justin Davidson (New York) | Liz Robbins (NYTimes) | James Russell (Bloomberg) | Larger Atlantic Yards Context (Atlantic Cities)

 

 

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Comments [25]

Michael D.D. White from Brooklyn Heights

I think that it is hard to evaluate what it looks like now or how attractive the ultimate set up will be. I do believe that if the other buildings are ever built on the block they will abut and that means that you won’t see as much of the weathering steel wreath that was added (covering the airplane hanger building underneath), much of the wreath may have to be taken down.

It’s hard to evaluate the aesthetics given what the arena represents. . . .

. . . . The arena pays no taxes - And it was used to spearhead eminent domain to clear a neighborhood to give Ratner a mega-monopoly, eliminating his competition and foreclosing negotiating options for the public. . . .

. . . How beautiful is that?

Oct. 02 2012 04:41 PM
Susan

I agree with Sheldon from Brooklyn. I like the design and the rusted weave on the outside.

It isn't the architects' fault that lies and crony capitalism destroyed the integrity of the development process, and the resulting plans.

If only the same architects had designed the Atlantic terminal building...

Oct. 02 2012 01:20 PM

I can't wait for what the supporters of this projects will do when the NBA & the Nets demand a new arena in 5 years... because that's the lifespan of a new stadium until the league decides that its no longer "revenue friendly".

Oct. 02 2012 12:12 PM

Every time I pass the building, I wonder when they are going to finish it. The rusty material is depressing, demoralizing, and looks like it should be covered with something. I do like the subway entrance with the grass, though I am very concerned with the traffic flow and pedestrian safety.

Oct. 02 2012 12:10 PM
Deebo from Prospect Heights

Libor Center
Greed Center
George 4 Man Named Ratner
The House that Fluff Built
Target Center
Should Have Built on My Mall Center
$300 "affordable housing" tickets for Barbra
The House that Our Subsidies Built
99 Problems and the 47% Gets all of 'em

How long will shutting down Atlantic Avenue for ten minutes for folks to cross the non crosswalk work?

No disrespect to the architects just Rat that hired em.

Oct. 02 2012 12:05 PM
John from Bklyn

How about the Big Boondoggle? The Barclays Interest Rate Rigger? Jay-Zs House O' Misogyny and Homophobia? The Rat Trap?

Oct. 02 2012 12:00 PM
Jonah from Ny

You should have covered it with plants, utopian is better than dystopian right?

Oct. 02 2012 11:58 AM
MikeInBrklyn from Clinton Hill

What a bunch of BS! Brooklyn Attitude? Pleeaazzzzze!! This is same kind of platitudinous nonsense that untalented (modern) artist and they purveyors resort to to sell whatever crap they are pushing. It is ugly plain and simple! End of story.

Oct. 02 2012 11:58 AM
Tony from Canarsie

It looks like a 1970's airport terminal mated with the spaceship from "Alien."

Oct. 02 2012 11:56 AM
RJ from prospect hts

I realize that the designers did not have a choice in the placement of the arena, but given it, it looks grotesquely out of place. I simply do not like it. It simply does not fit with the neighborhood. I've grown up in an architectural/construction family, and I know there are materials and construction limitations, but also that there are a great range and that these folks are simply wrong in distinguishing what would fit the neighborhood. There are so many colors to the neighborhood--the range of browns and pinks and beiges--that could have been better chosen. And if the alleged housing--after all, there's 25 years to go and the "community benefit agreement" has *zero* enforcement mechanism--gets built, where's the proof that it won't end up sticking out like a sore thumb, as the Richard Meier chrome and glass monstrosity on Eastern Pkwy and Grand Army Plaza.

Oct. 02 2012 11:56 AM
Brian from BK

Fine with the design, but the "Barclays Center" lettering is way too large, in an ugly font/color. It ruins the building.

Oct. 02 2012 11:55 AM
Daniel from P. Slope

Sheldon, what budget did they have?

Oct. 02 2012 11:54 AM
Leo from queens

Brooklyn has attitude? !! If the goal of this mega project was to modernize and gentrify Brooklyn, then why build something that looks run down?

Oct. 02 2012 11:53 AM
Hal from Crown Heights

I agree that the rusty look is sad. Dreary.

Oct. 02 2012 11:52 AM
Seth Pickenstiff

Ask the architects if they feel any moral shame for what they've done to the area, and how it drives down any hope of renewal for those left to live around it? Like any stadium you just created the next slum of New York. I feel sad for these guys.

Oct. 02 2012 11:52 AM
David Sachs

You mean the Rustoleum Center?

What's up with the white roof?

While I have not been inside, it's just so ugly from the outside.

Oct. 02 2012 11:51 AM
Megan from Brooklyn, NY

Please explain the rust color? Also, is it me or does it look like an evil alien eye?

Oct. 02 2012 11:49 AM
DarkSymbolist from NYC!

My only question is why is it so ugly on the outside and why does it look like some repurposed abandoned structure?

Oct. 02 2012 11:49 AM
Tonero Williams from Brooklyn

Hi Brian,
Could you please ask the architects about the Barclay logo and name on their building. Did they have a say on
how and where it would be placed?
I was pleasantly surprised watching the building going up, then the Barclay logos was placed on it.

I feel their building lost it's intelligent, thrilling design.

Why so big? It looks and feels like an after thought. Or a building that was used for another purpose before it became the Barclay Center.
Thanks,
love your show!

Oct. 02 2012 11:44 AM
Sheldon from Brooklyn

Lucy and Michael - I hear you but this is about the design of the stadium. The land theft, broken promises, and subsides is for another segment.

Norman, great question - crown control after an event is and will be a problem. I thought they would have built an overpass or underpass across Atlantic.

Oct. 02 2012 11:09 AM
bernie from bklyn

hey guys- great job on the huge, annoying, rusty bowl you created! can't wait to see how it looks in 2022!! you guys are funny!

Oct. 02 2012 11:03 AM
Norman Oder from Brooklyn

What do the architects think about the mid-block Atlantic Avenue exit, which has led to crowds spilling into Atlantic Avenue after events and crossing in the middle of the street, forcing police to shut down the street for 10 minutes or so.

Was that crowd behavior anticipated? Should there be a new crosswalk/light? Any other fix? What about after weekend afternoon events, when traffic is heavier and traffic diversion more problematic.?

Oct. 02 2012 10:59 AM
lucy from Brooklyn

It is not about the arena or its design. It is about the public subsidies, up to 3 billion dollars, that were given by our state, supposedly because of the tens of thousands of jobs and 2250 affordable housing units that the developer promised. We saw the destruction of a thriving vibrant, diverse, neighborhood in exchange for an arena, parking lots and a construction zone for up to 25 years. The arena is a Trojan horse.

Oct. 02 2012 10:53 AM
Michael D.D. White from Brooklyn Heights

It’s appropriate that this segment comes right after a Wall Street segment on “Too Big Too Fail.” The Forest City Ratner/Mikhail Prokhorov project also advanced itself with a strategy that proclaimed it was “Too Big Too Fail.” Now we have the “Barclays” Libor Center.

The thing to remember about making Ratner’s mega-monopoly so big is that it doesn’t just wipe out Ratner’s competition, it's intended to knock out the public’s negotiating power. That includes the public’s ability to negotiate quality and benefit.

Oct. 02 2012 10:43 AM
Sheldon from Brooklyn

When the much lauded Gehry designs were scuttled, I braced myself for a stadium with the typical Ratner blandness.

I was pleasantly surprised when I saw the renderings - It is bold, it is brave, it is unique.

The rusted exterior actually works. The architects did a wonderful job with the budget they had.

Oct. 02 2012 09:50 AM

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