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Friday, September 28, 2012

On today’s show: Ro Khanna, the former deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce, discusses the importance of manufacturing to America’s future. American tenor Matthew Polenzani and director Barlett Sher discuss their roles in the Metropolitan Opera’s opening night production of Donizetti’s L’Elisir d’Amore. Andy Borowitz, creator of the Borowitz Report, talks about the presidential election so far. Please Explain is all about new technologies for prosthetics.

Manufacturing and America's Future

Ro Khanna, a former deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce, argues that, despite everything you've heard about the economy, America continues to be a world leader in manufacturing. In Entrepreneurial Nation: Why Manufacturing is Still Key to America’s Future, he shows that innovative companies are staying ahead of the curve, and looks at why the American steel industry, aerospace companies, the defense technology sector are still world leaders.

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Matthew Polenzani and Bartlett Sher on L’Elisir d’Amore

American tenor Matthew Polenzani discusses his starring role in the Metropolitan Opera’s opening night production of the comedy L’Elisir d’Amore (The Elixir of Love). He’s joined by  Bartlett Sher, who is staging it, his first opening night production. This production brings out a political message about Italian independence in addition to the traditional love story of the libretto. The opera runs through October 13, then returns for two weeks in late January/early February.

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The Borowitz Report

Andy Borowitz, author of the Borowitz Report on The New Yorker.com, talks about the presidential election so far.

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Please Explain: Prosthetics

Alena Grabowski, Assistant Research Professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, and research scientists at the Department of Veterans Affairs in Denver, and Mike McLoughlin, Research and Exploratory Development at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory describe the latest prosthetic design and technologies and how they allow amputees to regain mobility.

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