Streams

Junot Diaz's This Is How You Lose Her

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Pulitzer Prize-winner Junot Diaz talks about his new book of stories, This Is How You Lose Her. It’s about the haunting, impossible power of love—obsessive love, illicit love, fading love, maternal love. At the heart of these stories is the irrepressible, irresistible Yunior, a young hardhead whose longing for love is equaled only by his recklessness—and by the extraordinary women he loves and loses.

Guests:

Junot Diaz
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Comments [6]

Bettie Hallen from Springfield, MA

Someone gave me THE BRIEF WONDROUS LIFE OF OSCAR WAO a few months ago, and I began reading it the other night. The very next morning on the way to work, an interview was taking place with the author of a new book. I'm listening and thinking... Dominican author?... Junot Diaz? Why I'm reading a book by that author! But OSCAR WAO was published five years ago. Now I can't put OSCAR down and have to go find THIS IS HOW YOU LOSE HER. I felt enlightened so much by the interview which included the revelation about how many men DO (or don't) think of women and treat us accordingly. It brought on a whole pattern of thought in a political vein about the description of whatever the hell a "legitimate rape"(Akin)might be. What Junot Diaz said about his character beginning to think of women as actual people who could be hurt and feel pain made me wonder... Really, are women EVER going to achieve the status of real people with brains as well as bodies and feelings that are worth consideration by the other half of the human population.

Sep. 13 2012 08:18 PM
Bruce, from Fairfield, CT

Can somebody translate Kelly's comment? It doesn't make sense to me. On one hand she rejects the bad grade for American men and on the other castigates them for being "barbaric". Also, don't understand the reference to "somewhere"
as it is counterpointed by "ELSEWHERE". Could be that English is her second language, so I forgive her, but I would still like to know what she is trying to say.

Sep. 11 2012 05:46 PM
rebekka Taubman from los angeles

Leonard,

You don't know Boston is Rasist? Do you know history? BUSSING, Celtic's and Red Soxes both the very late to get black players.

Sep. 11 2012 01:02 PM
Kelly

I'm sorry, I just heard Mr. Diaz say that "American men would receive an F" if women were asked their opinion of them. He is so wrong. Please. I'm not one to grade American men, or men in general, but I know from my own Latina friends, that the stereotypes come from somewhere.

He is trying to excuse the behavior of these men, which is barbaric. Period. And the women in that culture would be right to look ELSEWHERE.

Sep. 11 2012 12:53 PM
Elle from Brooklyn

I adored "The Sun, the Moon, the Stars." I haven't yet read "Oscar Wao," but it has been highly recommended to me by many people whose opinions I trust. I plan to get to it soon, and now I will have to put this one on my list, too. Thanks for a great interview.

Sep. 11 2012 12:52 PM
Andrea from Philadelphia

When I read the story "This is How You lose Her" in the New Yorker it blew me away for exactly the reason Junot just mentioned. I couldn't remember ever reading anything that captured a man's internal thought process and emotional ups and downs in a way that seemed so honest and real. Looking forward to reading the whole book.

Sep. 11 2012 12:52 PM

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