Streams

Deferred Action So Far

Monday, August 20, 2012

Chung-Wha Hong, executive director of the NY Immigration Coalition, discusses how the new federal Deferred Action program is going so far and whether young immigrants are taking advantage of it in large numbers.

Guests:

Chung-Wha Hong
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Comments [5]

Dreamer from NY

Majority of my life has been spent in the U.S. as an illegal immigrant. I've strived to better myself in everything I do all my life as a result of growing up in America. America is my home despite the occasional racist slur, the "barely making ends meet" living standard, and the constant fear of being deported. I love this country for its people, its culture, and the whole American mentality of pioneering in everything you do. I've only come to realize this year after taking a U.S. History class in school. Going into the class I wasn't enthusiastic at all, but all that changed probably because my teacher made the class interesting and truly was a walking American textbook. My only goal in life (my American Dream) is to serve this country in the military or become a public official that can make a change in someone's life just like my U.S. teacher did for me. Wherever this deferred action plan may lead I will always call the United States of America my home and thank it for the person it made me today. This truly is the greatest nation on Earth.

Aug. 21 2012 09:37 AM
Lucy from new york, queens

http://www.weownthedream.org/ is a screening tool that undocumented students are using this to screen themselves for their elibility for Deferred Action , also The Public Interest Project has set up a fund to help dreamers cover the fees of the cost and they are accepting donations now http://www.publicinterestprojects.org/funds-projects/special-projects/fund-for-dreamers/

Aug. 20 2012 11:15 AM
Karol Ruiz from Newark NJ

United We Dream, a national organization committed to lobbying for the DREAM Act and supporting undocumented students, has called for a National Deferred Action Application Day on August 25th. The NJ Dream Act Coalition (NJ DAC), an affiliate of United We Dream, is organizing and training volunteers to assist youth in completing the deferred action and work authorization applications free of charge. Sadly, a few attorneys and notary publics are taking advantage of the great need for relief among this population and charging exuberant rates.
Supervising attorneys and clinical law students from the Center for Social Justice of Seton Hall Law School, law students from the Women's Law Forum of Seton Hall Law School, law students from the National Lawyer’s Guild Chapter of Rutgers Law School-Newark, as well as students from the LGBTQ Resource and Diversity Center at Rutgers, have committed to co-sponsor this event with NJ DAC. The event will be held on Saturday August 25, 2012 in rooms 255-7 of the Paul Robeson Cultural Center of Rutgers-Newark, 350 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd, Newark, NJ. Volunteers will receive training from 8:00am to 10:00am and will then assist applicants with the Deferred Action application from 11:00am to 5:00pm.

You may register as a volunteer at http://www.njdac.org/volunteer.php.

Aug. 20 2012 10:47 AM
Latish from Brooklyn

I think the lack of response to this segment is testament to people having other more pressing issues to worry about in this economy -- other than competing with illegal residents.

Aug. 20 2012 10:44 AM
Elle from Brooklyn

This is somewhat off the subject, but I have been very upset lately to see several women panhandling on the streets and subways with their young children. I am guessing that many of these women may be illegal immigrants who are too afraid to apply for help for their kids. What are their options? There must be something better than children begging in the streets.

Aug. 20 2012 10:29 AM

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