Streams

That's My Issue Open Phones: Changing Your Mind

Friday, August 17, 2012

We continue the That's My Issue series, asking about how personal experience has shaped your politics. Today: Have you had an experience that has changed your mind about an issue? Maybe you've switched sides, or become more ambivalent? Give us a call at 212-433-9692!

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Comments [7]

Sergey Zavyalov from New York

Hi Brian,
Really appreciate this portion when i heard it on the radio...i think your show needs to have an additional hour added for just this type of listener interaction. Now to the meat….

What I noticed was that it is not MY ideology that changed over the last decade, but the ideology of the American political system that became so extreme that people don’t even recognize their parties. Meaning the democrats and republican parties are both passing and supporting extreme positions of their parties. Thus when we vote in November, we are not voting for democrats or republicans but we are voting for Communists or Fascists respectively...

Yet the independents are still not being given the respect, the voice and exposure they deserve…the political, just like the financial system is rigged in a way to only benefit the few people behind the scenes and do not even try to represent the American public.

I am not a Communist, nor am I a Fascist…so why do I have to vote for them??

Aug. 20 2012 01:43 PM
EugeniaRenskoff from Brooklyn, NY

Hi, Brian, The experience that changed my life and made me see people as they can be and not as they seem to be was my mortgage fraud/predatory lending/foreclosure in Atlanta, GA in the early part of the 2000s. Up to then, I paid my bills on time, had excellent credit and thought that I had people I could count on. After I got foreclosed in November 2005, I found out there was nobody. The people I had known for most of my life knew that the mortgage fraud and foreclosure situation was not my fault, yet they did not want to be associated with me. Now, in August 2012, I am being evicted. Before this, I slept on the streets of Manhattan and the subway. It is like being foreclosed all over again. I cannot describe the emotional pain I feel. It is something that nobody needs to go through. It is an experience beyond belief as far as the toll that it has taken on my life. Eugenia Renskoff

Aug. 17 2012 12:56 PM
Howard from The Bronx

The caller who used the phrase "There's a lot of money in poverty" sounded a very false note. If there are inefficiencies in the distribution system, that's not a fault in the idea of helping the poor. The phrase came from the finding that private companies and corporations were preying on the poor though money lending, check cashing, etc.

http://www.ringnebula.com/project-censored/1994/1994-story9.htm

Aug. 17 2012 11:15 AM

immigration reform, low k-12 academic standards reform, and local government corruption are my issues in NJ

Aug. 17 2012 11:08 AM
Truth & Beauty from Brooklyn

I find that I have way more than one issue, and I discourage others from predicating their vote on only one issue. The Democrats and Republicans are diametrically opposed on so many important issues that there should not be much difficulty deciding how to vote.

Aug. 17 2012 10:57 AM
fuva from harlemworld

All the anti-union callers are haters. They seem to resent union benefits because their own private sector benefits have been cut. This, at the same time that CEO pay has skyrocketed. But, instead of questioning this growing income divide, they'd rather hate on other middle-class workers. What crabs. What a pathetic race to the bottom they're advocating...

Aug. 17 2012 10:57 AM
Seth Pecksniff

It's the Ryan/Romney ticket... kinda like Democrat Party.

Aug. 17 2012 10:29 AM

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