Streams

Charles Yu's Sorry Please Thank You

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

Charles Yu, author of the widely praised debut novel How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe, talks about his new collection of short stories, Sorry Please Thank You. Drawing from both pop culture and science, Yu is a sharp observer of contemporary society, and his stories combine humor and insight into the human condition.

Guests:

Charles Yu
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Comments [6]

Jim

DL, Your point about name calling is valid, but the Obama campaign is calling Romney a felon. Is that racist too?

Aug. 01 2012 01:36 PM
John A

I follow the multiple personalities of hardcore onliners, so, fascinating. This could perhaps my my first book purchase, in fiction, in many years.

Aug. 01 2012 01:30 PM
Tony from Canarsie

Is the fictional Charles Yu any relation to Hugh Person, the protagonist of Nabokov's last novel, "Transparent Things"?

Aug. 01 2012 01:28 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

When I was age 12, back in 1958, I was a "hard core" book reader. I spent all my spare time reading. Now, at age 66, I'm a "hard core" video gamer, spending all my spare time playing good video games. It's just a progression from a lower lever of virtual reality to a higher level of virtual reality. It's all entertainment meant to engross and divert one from the tedium and brutality of "real" reality.

Aug. 01 2012 01:21 PM
eleniNYC from Jackson Heights

Of course the old-time granddaddy of dead-end jobs: "Bartleby the Scrivner" and his dead-end copywriters job.
"The Suicide Note" sounds like something Melville could have written today.
I had read in the Sunday Times years ago about how people pay others to stand in lines for them until they got there.
Good work Charles Yu

Aug. 01 2012 01:17 PM
Julia Joseph from Manhattan

We already outsource our pain, psychologically. That's kind of what denial is. It's a basic concept in Jungian Psychology as to how collective consciousness works and the scapegoat complex. What we repress or deny in ourselves gets carried out, felt or expressed by others for us.

Aug. 01 2012 01:12 PM

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