Streams

Local Politics Heating Up

Monday, July 09, 2012

Azi Paybarah, political reporter for Capital New York, discusses the headlines in local politics, from the Rangel-Espaillat race likely getting settled to the ongoing lockout of ConEd workers.

Guests:

Azi Paybarah
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Comments [3]

Bob from B'klyn

Mr. Espaillat is a sore loser and by pursuing this matter further, he sets himself up for future failure. NYS redistricting has caused confusion with 3 and in some cases 4 primary and main elections scheduled in a few short months. This is expensive nonsense. NYS redistricting was done by the liberal judges in the federal court to do 5 things - (1) destroy and punish Bob Turner's district; (2) break up the increasingly conservative Jewish vote in Brooklyn & Queens; (3) create a Spanish district in upper Manhattan and the Bronx; (4) create an Asian district in Queens and (5) destroy a conservative Republican upstate seat held by a woman. Had anyone had the balls to sue the court and the state there would be no elections at all in NYS. This redistricting has been horrifically and impermissibly racist, ageist, attack on gender and anti-Semitic. The redistricting should be overturned and may very well be.

Jul. 09 2012 10:59 AM
gary from queens


best solution to voting problems:

An Electoral System You Can Count On
http://americandaily.com/article/11197

Jul. 09 2012 10:40 AM

So the striking ConEd workers are now locked out of health insurance coverage, accdg to WNYC news. Begs the question -- were/are unions doing all they can to fight for universal health coverage -- or at least coverage even while they strike so that health care does not interfere with their hard-won right to fight for their working conditions?

Jul. 09 2012 09:45 AM

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