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Monday, July 09, 2012

CBS News correspondent Dan Raviv gives a history of Israel's spies and a super-secret unit inside the Mossad. Mary R. Morgan, daughter of former governor of New York Nelson A. Rockefeller, talks about coming to terms with the mysterious disappearance of her twin brother in the 1961. Anthony Heilbut discusses some of the figures who transformed the American cultural landscape—from gospel to Aretha Franklin to soap opera creators. Michael Findlay explains the art market and examines the value of art for all of us.

Inside Israel's Intelligence Services

CBS News correspondent Dan Raviv tells the history of Israel's intelligence services—led by the Mossad—from the country's independence in 1948 to the current regional crises. Spies Against Armageddon: Inside Israel's Secret Wars examines the challenges and innovative solutions of Israel's intelligence services.

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Mary Morgan on Beginning with the End

Mary R. Morgan, daughter of former governor of New York Nelson A. Rockefeller, discusses the death of her twin brother, Michael, who disappeared off the remote coast of southern New Guinea in 1961. Beginning with the End: A Memoir of Twin Loss and Healing, is about coming to terms with that loss.

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The Fan Who Knew Too Much

Cultural historian and biographer Anthony Heilbut looks at some of our American icons and iconic institutions, high, low, and exalted. The Fan Who Knew Too Much: Aretha Franklin, the Rise of the Soap Opera, Children of the Gospel Church, and Other Meditations is an exploration of art and obsession and the figures who transformed the American cultural landscape.

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The Value of Art

Art dealer and market expert Michael Findlay explains the market for art—and art's value for all of us. The Value of Art: Money, Power, Beauty looks at almost a half century in the business of art and shows how artworks are valued. 

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Tributes: Ernest Borgnine

The seemingly gruff, gap-toothed Ernest Borgnine won an Oscar for best actor with his portrayal of a lonely Bronx butcher in “Marty.”  But he starred in over 190 film and television roles over a career that spanned six decades – including the rapscallion boat skipper in “McHale’s Navy.”  Borgnine died at the age of 95.  And you can listen to him reminisce about his colorful past when he spoke with guesthost Dean Olsher in August, 2008, for his autobiography, Ernie.

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