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4th of July History Lesson... and Quiz!

Tuesday, July 03, 2012

(Andrew Morrell Photography/flickr)

Just in time for the 4th of July, catch up on your American history with Kenneth C. Davis, author of the "Don't Know Much About" series, including the anniversary edition of Don't Know Much About History.

Listeners: Call in to put your American-history knowledge to the test in our 4th of July quiz! Call us at 212-433-9692.

Guests:

Kenneth C. Davis

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Comments [14]

Edward from Washington Heights AKA pretentious Hudson Heights

Jeremy from NYC, Please end your brutal occupation of Native American land.

Where will you return to?

Jul. 03 2012 12:44 PM
Greg Caulfield

I was just on the show fourth 4. Of July. Quiz .
I just wright a book title hiking the Appalachian trail. I will be hiking this summer the trail . The trail is a big part of America
History. Greg

Jul. 03 2012 12:38 PM
John from Fanwood

Hey Brian, there's a great repository of history across the street from your studio. The National Archives at New York is above the Post Office.

Jul. 03 2012 11:41 AM
Nick from UWS

Talk about American history....it has just been announced that Andy Griffith has died.

Jul. 03 2012 11:37 AM
Amy from Manhattan

I thought you were going to say Vince Foster's death for the other Clinton "scandal."

Jul. 03 2012 11:34 AM
Elle from Brooklyn

Jennifer Flowers!

Jul. 03 2012 11:30 AM
Chris Garvey from Amityville

Rap version of DECLARATION
When in the course of human events
A people, once free, are pressed to relent
Inestimable rights to a distant tyrant
Then the bands that connect them they need to have rent:

As we take up our station, with nature's consent,
That is sep'rate and equal, .
respect (a decent),
For Opinions of Mankind, requires we present,
And declare all that caused and impelled this event.

We hold, now, these truths to be self-evident,
That all men, by God, here, with some rights, have been sent,
To secure these rights, men institute Governments,
Which derive their just Powers from Governed's consent.

When these ends, any Government tends to demolish,
It's the Right of the People to change or abolish.
We would not do so lightly; prudence would admonish.
But follow our inj'ries, by King George, despotish:

On his sole will, our judges he has made dependent.
Made multitudes of offices (which we resent),
And swarms of new officers, hither he's sent;
To harrass our People, and eat out their Substance.

World trade he's cut off, though demand, up is pent.
He's imposed on us taxes, without our consent.
Altering fundamentally our government.
Burning towns, killing people, who's thoughts are diff'rent.

At each stage, for our redress, petitions we've sent,
We have warned British brethren, against their attempts,
And explained the conditions of our Settlement,
They've been deaf to it all. So, Dear God, our intent's,
To declare that these STATES are now INDEPENDENT!

And, to be sure that the tyrant's a goner,
We pledge our Lives, Fortunes, and our Sacred Honor.

Copyright 1993 C.Garvey
12:20p 5-25-93

Jul. 03 2012 11:29 AM
Jeremy from NYC

Brian,

You are so far off on the number of Iraqi's killed by America. Yes, 100,000 during the gulf war 1, obviously much, much worse than what Nazi's did during WWII to partizans (there the usual number was kill 100 for every german killed). The US, being a righteous and always honorable country, ups that to 1,000 per American killed. There were an estimated 500,000 children killed as a result of the "Honorable" sanctions that the US imposed on Iraq after Gulf War I. And another estimated 500,000-1,000,000 Iraqi's killed as a result of the second Gulf War.

These numbers are critically important though you are very, very cavalier about them with your "Oh My" comment. It's absolutely disgusting. You should be deeply ashamed. Imagine if someone came to the US and killed more than a million people. Would you say "Oh My"? Somehow I doubt it.

Take your job more seriously when you speak about the destruction that the US wreaks on poor people around the world as it steals their resources.

Jeremy.

Jul. 03 2012 11:29 AM
Amy from Manhattan

I'd say Desert Storm was the 1st phase of that war. The land war was days or weeks later & was called Desert Sword. There was also a Desert Shield component, but I don't remember what it was.

I do remember that some of the Iraqi troops killed along the Highway of Death were trying to retreat, & that there was an incident in which a wall was bulldozed onto wounded but still living Iraqi soldiers. I don't think it got the degree of attention or investigation that Abu Ghraib & other abuses in the later Iraq war.

Jul. 03 2012 11:26 AM
MichaelB from Morningside Heights

It just goes to show how much our predisposition & prejudices, or the power of suggestion influence us.

Geo Bush looking at his watch could just as easily been interpreted as him checking the time left for his opponent to answer, or how long his opponent was taking, i.e., a strategic inquiry.

But once the idea was planted that he was impatient to get out of there, as if he had a dinner date waiting, that's all we can see.

Jul. 03 2012 11:26 AM
linda duerr from jersy shore

JFK (easy peas) and @MichaelB.. T Jefferson and J Adams

Jul. 03 2012 11:25 AM
Amy from Manhattan

I'd say Desert Storm was the 1st phase of that war. The land war was days or weeks later & was called Desert Sword. There was also a Desert Shield component, but I don't remember what it was.

I do remember that some of the Iraqi troops killed along the Highway of Death were trying to retreat, & that there was an incident in which a wall was bulldozed onto wounded but still living Iraqi soldiers. I don't think it got the degree of attention or investigation that Abu Ghraib & other abuses in the later Iraq war did.

Jul. 03 2012 11:24 AM
Elle from Brooklyn

Yes! I was yelling, "Looking at his watch!"

Jul. 03 2012 11:21 AM
MichaelB from Morningside Heights

Which 2 MAJOR Founding Fathers died within hours of each other on July 4th, 1826, exactly 50 years to the day after the signing of the great document?

(More background: The two were originally very close, sharing European diplomatic duties of the early years of the republic, then became bitter political enemies, and finally reconciled, carrying on a correspondence for years in their retirement and into old age.)

Jul. 03 2012 11:07 AM

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