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Watch | 5 Films about TV Nightly News Before 'The Newsroom' Premiere

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Jeff Daniels, playing the cable news anchor Will McAvoy, in Season 3 of 'The Newsroom.' Jeff Daniels, playing the cable news anchor Will McAvoy, in Season 3 of 'The Newsroom.' (Melissa Moseley/HBO)

Fans of "The West Wing," "The Social Network" and "Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip" are eagerly awaiting the premiere of Aaron Sorkin's next brainchild, "The Newsroom." The show, starring Jeff Daniels as the cable news anchor Will McAvoy, Emily Mortimer as the "News Night" executive producer and Sam Waterston as everyone's boss, debuts on HBO on Sunday night.

"The show isn't just about the news. It's about the personal lives of the people who are working here in this newsroom," said Sorkin in an HBO video previewing the show.

NPR interviewed Daniels about the show and covered the release of the first Season 1 trailer in April. Since then, HBO has released several others teasers, including this one:

And here's another:

With the debut of "The Newsroom" just a few days away, we decided to pull together a list of five other films set in and around TV newsrooms.

"Network," the 1976 film starring Peter Finch, Faye Dunaway, Robert Duvall and William Holden, is at the top of the list.

Will Ferrell plays the unforgettable Ron Burgundy in "Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy."

Jane Fonda stars in 1979's "The China Syndrome" as a cub reporter.

David Strathairn plays the legendary Edward R. Murrow in the 2005 film "Good Night, and Good Luck."

And Holly Hunter, William Hurt, Albert Brooks and Joan Cusack star in the 1987 romantic comedy "Broadcast News," which is also set in a television newsroom.

The New York Times also has a good list of classic films featuring newsrooms.

What's your favorite movie set in or around a newsroom? Let us know in the comments below.

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