Streams

New Arts Space to Open in Fort Greene, Brooklyn

Thursday, June 14, 2012

BAM's new Richard B. Fisher Building will be devoted to showing the work of emerging and established artists. BAM's new Richard B. Fisher Building will be devoted to showing the work of emerging and established artists. (Julieta Cervantes/BAM)

The Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) unveiled its new performing arts space on Thursday. The 40,000 square-foot Richard B. Fisher Building, or BAM Fisher, sits in the footprint of the old Salvation Army building at 321 Ashland Place in Fort Greene. The space, which has its official opening on Sept. 5, will be devoted to showing the work of emerging and established artists.

“The vision of BAM Fisher was to create an open space to permit adventurous exploration into new approaches to visual imagery, movement, technology and storytelling,” the academy's executive producer, Joseph V. Melillo, said in a statement.

BAM Fisher includes a 250-seat theater, a rehearsal and performance studio, a rooftop garden and a theater workshop space that will host community arts education programs.

The renovation of 321 Ashland Place cost $50 million, and was raised through a combination of city, state and private funds, according to a company press release.

BAM Fisher will open with the company's New Wave Festival this fall. Tickets cost $20.

The Judith and Alan Fishman Space is a flexible 250-seat theater.
Julieta Cervantes/BAM
The Judith and Alan Fishman Space is a flexible 250-seat theater.
Another shot of the theater.
Julieta Cervantes/BAM
Another shot of the theater.
The Rita K. Hillman Studio is 1,600 square feet. It will be used by artists rehearsing or developing work and as a second performance space.
Julieta Cervantes/BAM
The Rita K. Hillman Studio is 1,600 square feet. It will be used by artists rehearsing or developing work and as a second performance space.
A rendering of the 40,000 square-foot Richard B. Fisher Building.
Hugh Hardy/ H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture/BAM
A rendering of the 40,000 square-foot Richard B. Fisher Building.
 
The Geraldine Stutz Gardens on the roof were designed by Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners and were installed by New York Green Roofs.
Julieta Cervantes/BAM
The Geraldine Stutz Gardens on the roof were designed by Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners and were installed by New York Green Roofs.

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Comments [2]

Nick from Brooklyn, NY

Actually, to say there were "zero" before is quite inaccurate. To name just one, http://irondale.org/history.html has been there for thirty years.

Apr. 06 2014 02:03 PM
Matt from Brooklyn, NY

How did we go from zero to three (ISSUE project room, Roulette, and now BAM Fisher) experimental performance spaces in downtown Brooklyn in one year?

I would love to hear a Brian Lehrer or Leonard Lopate segment with staff from all three in discussion (+ Marty Markowitz?).

Jun. 14 2012 03:17 PM

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