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Plays in the Park and Boris Johnson

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Monday, June 11, 2012

Boris Johnson (Photo courtesy of the author)

Oskar Eustis, Kevin Kline, and Jeffrey Wright discuss 50 years at the Delacorte and this year's Shakespeare in the Park lineup. We’ll hear the story of Samuel Zemurray and the United Fruit Company, and how American’s desire for bananas disrupted Central American politics for decades. Mark Sundeen talks about his decision to quit using money. Plus, Boris Johnson, the mayor of London, talks about how his city became one of the most exciting and influential places on Earth.

Oskar Eustis, Kevin Kline, and Jeffrey Wright Celebrate the Delacorte's 50th Anniversary

Oskar Eustis, artistic director at the Public Theater, and Shakespeare in the Park alumni Kevin Kline and Jeffrey Wright talk about celebrating the 50th anniversary the Delacorte Theater and the 2012 season of Shakespeare in the Park, which includes Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” and Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's musical “Into the Woods.”

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The Life and Times of America's Banana King

Rich Cohen tells the story of Samuel Zemurray, who arrived in America in 1891, penniless, and became one of the richest, most powerful men in the world. The Fish that Ate the Whale: The Life and Times of America's Banana King unveils Zemurray as a hidden kingmaker and capitalist revolutionary, connected to the birth of modern American diplomacy, public relations, business, and war.

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The Man Who Quit Money

Mark Sundeen tells about Daniel Suelo, who in 2000 left his life savings—all thirty dollars of it—in a phone booth and has lived without money ever since. In The Man Who Quit Money Sundeen gives an account of how he learned to live, sanely and happily, without earning, receiving, or spending a single cent.

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London Mayor Boris Johnson

Boris Johnson, mayor of London, talks about how London became one of the most exciting and influential places on Earth. In Johnson's Life of London, he tells the story of his city and the outsized characters—famous and infamous, brilliant and bizarre—who have shaped it.

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