Streams

Tiny Museums: The Noguchi Museum

Friday, May 18, 2012

Jenny Dixon, director of The Noguchi Museum, discusses the museum, founded and designed by Japanese-American artist Isamu Noguchi.

Guests:

Jenny Dixon
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Comments [4]

Ian Lyn from Brooklyn

Zion Gallery is a small local gallery in the heart of Bedford Stuyvesant. It is located on the garden level of 152 MacDonough Street at the corner of Troop Avenue. They showcase artwork of local artist. This month they have a 2 photographers Ian and Sena displaying their work titled New York Country-The serinity in the city
Their hours are Sat and Sunday 1-6pm and weekdays by appointment only. (718)819-7466
Brooklyn

May. 20 2012 04:14 PM
Alexis Gordon

I was apart of the Making Your Mark teen program at the Noguchi Museum the summer of 2009 when I was in high school and it was the best experience ever! I learned and created so much. I recommend any one is high school do this summer program, it is a one-of-a-kind experience!

May. 19 2012 02:04 AM
Elaine Comparone

Noguchi Museum curator Dixon, in her brief description of the jewel that is this place, did not mention
that Noguchi was also a political animal. Perhaps his most moving sculpture is "The Lynching"---this may not be the exact title---but the subject is unmistakeable. He was an admirer and, perhaps, lover of Frieda Kahlo for a short time until Diego Rivera threatened him. Noguchi is said to have jumped out of Frieda's window to escape Diego's jealous wrath. Noguchi created a beautiful bas-relief celebrating workers in a site of one of Mexico City's main market. It is worth seeking out if you make it to MC.

And don't miss this Museum. The stone sculptures are gorgeous, there's so much to see and that garden is a peaceful dream. Go there!!

May. 18 2012 12:13 PM
Estelle

I highly recommend visiting this museum! It's fascinating.

May. 18 2012 11:28 AM

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