Streams

The New Geography of Jobs

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

U.C. Berkely economist Enrico Moretti examines the factors reshaping America’s labor market—from globalization and income inequality to immigration and technology—and how these shifts are affecting our communities. His book The New Geography of Jobs draws on a wealth of stimulating new studies to outline policies that may address the social challenges that are arising.

Guests:

Enrico Moretti

Comments [20]

amalgam from NYC by day, NJ by night

@ Calls'em - Your anti-regulation, anti-human health rants against the EPA are just simplistic talking points and are largely inaccurate and that the EPA has not lost jobs and added unnecessary costs. Here you go:

http://www.npr.org/2011/07/06/137643148/white-house-study-explains-why-epa-is-a-target

"Harvard Economics Professor Robert Stavins...research shows regulations can create some short-term jobs. Workers are needed to make and install pollution control devices and build cleaner power plants. In the long term, Stavins says, the RULES DON'T HAVE A BIG IMPACT ON JOBS ONE WAY OR ANOTHER - although you wouldn't know that by listening to the politicians. [my CAP emphasis]

Professor ROBERT STAVINS (Economics, Harvard University): What's unfortunate about this is those who support more environmental regulation have promoted it as job creation, rather than as environmental protection. And those who are opposed to it, for whatever reasons, have featured it as job killing. In fact it is neither."

May. 17 2012 09:54 AM
cutny from Brooklyn

Yo Leonard! With regard to your question "Who would enter for the iPad that didn't pledge?"

May I answer that I pledge each fall. When the spring fundraiser rolls in, you can bet I register for the iPad without pledging for a second time. Haven't won yet!

May. 17 2012 01:00 AM
David

For those of you who think that the Democratic Party, unlike the Republican Party, is not controlled by the Banksters:

http://www.democracynow.org/2011/10/20/headlines/obama_tops_gop_candidates_in_wall_st_donations

Obama Tops GOP Candidates in Wall Street Donations

New figures show President Obama continues to pull in huge donations from the financial sector, with more money from Wall Street this year than all other Republican presidential candidates combined. According to the Washington Post, Obama has raised a total of $15.6 million from banks and other financial firms, with nearly $12 million of that going to the Democratic National Committee. Republican frontrunner Mitt Romney has raised less than half that much from Wall Street, around $7.5 million. A top banking executive and Obama fundraiser told the Washington Post that reports of Wall Street antagonism toward Obama "are exaggerated and overblown ... [but] it probably helps from a political perspective if he’s not seen as a Wall Street guy."

May. 16 2012 05:40 PM

Further more:

The FBI, FCC and members of Congress are investigating JPMC.

Google it!!

May. 16 2012 02:03 PM

sophia~

Don't wast the keystrokes.

Dumb is REALLY dumb.

May. 16 2012 01:25 PM

BTW:

Our corrupt banking system is fueled by a non-partisan coterie.

Including; Reagan, the Bushes, Clinton, Graham, Greenspan, Geithner, Summers, Obama etc, etc... etc.

$$ HAS CORRUPTED THE ENTIRE PROCESS. NO ONE IS IMMUNE. WE ALL SUFFER.

May. 16 2012 01:23 PM
sophia

@Calls'em

"You are so ignorant you don't even realize everything you say is factually inaccurate"

Please, enlighten us with more Fox News talking points and no evidence.

I DO realize Obama is captive to the banking and investment interests, even as he insults and attacks them, but you DON'T seem to realize that puts you on the same side.

May. 16 2012 01:02 PM

Calls'em from McLean, Va.~

The point is the banks, including JPMC continue to gamble with our money whilst being insured by the taxpayers.

Did you enjoy bailing out the "too big to fail" banking system that bankrupted the WORLD economy??

I call MORONIC, on you.

Fire-up the Google, yourself!

Thanks for trying to keep-up, though.

May. 16 2012 12:58 PM
Anon

Job mobility might lead to economic benefits, but there can be serious psychological effects from the perpetual movement of people and families. I think repeatedly uprooting one's life leads to a feeling of detachment from community and family. It also poses significant challenges when parents are aging or there is a need for childcare since families are separated and need to rely more on hired (and costly) help to do what the family unit used to provide.

May. 16 2012 12:51 PM
Calls'em from McLean, Va.

Sophia, you are so ignorant that you don't realize that everything you say is factually inaccurate. Your assertions are laughable. These days, even you can "goggle" an issue and get enough info to learn what is really happening. What you do seem to understand is that 0bama is a traitor to all the left wing results that he promised you folks. He is a complete captive of the big banking and investment businesses, even as he insults and attacks them. He is an epic failure and is taking us all with him, especially the poor and the young.

May. 16 2012 12:49 PM
sophia

@Calls'em

Please stop being a mouth piece for the 1%. If JP Morgan lost 200 billion we'd be bailing them out just like the last time. It should appeal even to conservatives that gambling should not be done with tax payer money.

And unfortunately Obama's EPA is almost as lame as Bush's. They've allowed more oil exploration than Bush, tried to help cover for BP, and Obama has done nothing but push for the tar-sands pipeline every chance he got. You should love him.

May. 16 2012 12:41 PM
Ariadne from NYC

The Chinese won't always accept the low wages they currently earn, and that tide is already beginning to come in. That will shake up the reliance on overseas labor forces our tech companies currently employ in the next few decades.

May. 16 2012 12:38 PM
MichaelB from Morningside Heights

When so many of us speak of "high tech" and service, we think only of the internet. And within that realm, so much is funneled into social media and, in effect, shopping and entertainment -- relatively "frivolous" endeavors or consumer-oriented.

But where are the real "hard" high tech: bio, chemical, engineering, invention, and the high tech that supports and improves manufacturing?

Or are we going to become a society that is only interested in amusing ourselves and sending our dollars overseas, until our balance of trade is so out of whack that we won't have enough money to amuse ourselves any longer?

May. 16 2012 12:37 PM
Louis

What about Miami, Florida? The economies of Latin America are growing. Does that mean jobs will grow in South Florida?

May. 16 2012 12:35 PM
Calls'em from McLean, Va.

Lenny, please stop being a mouth piece for the class warfare canard the regime is flogging to distract from its abject failure. You are smarter and better than that. The $2 bil "lost" by JPMorgan, merely means that their profits are down 5% for this year and the stock price temporarily went down. No one is losing their job except for a few traders who should be fired. The money is not "missing" like the money missing from leftist Democrat and former NJ Governor & Senator John Corzine's invest firm. Those folks are going to jail. The money JPM "lost" was made by other firms both here and abroad. Someone wins and someone loses whenever there are hedges. Many people at JP Morgan listen to and pledge to WNYC and NPR and PBS so don't be too hard on them.

May. 16 2012 12:30 PM
josh karan from Washington Heights, northern Manhattan

An unplanned capitalist economy cannot solve the problem of unemployment.
Only public legislation can:
Just as the work week was reduced to 40 hours, we need legislation for 40 hours pay for 30 hours work.
If the capitalists try to move their jobs overseas, call them traitors to America, and tax them punitively.
Commit public resources to essential jobs that cannot be outsourced -- teachers, nurses, alternative energy workers.
To imply that this is insoluble is a recipe for defeatism.
Stop whining and start acting.

May. 16 2012 12:26 PM

Please ask the professor to explain what happened to the Service Economy while corporations and business are cutting out the Support function from their products and eliminating Quality Assurance.

May. 16 2012 12:21 PM
Yesman

Productivity does increase overall prosperity. Back when, you had 10 people making $1000. Now you have one person making $20,000, and 9 people unemployed. Average income among the 10 doubles. Pretty good right? Typical economist viewpoint.

May. 16 2012 12:21 PM
sophia

For the past 30 years the benefits of productivity haven't gone to the vast majority of workers, they've gone exclusively to those at the very top.

May. 16 2012 12:20 PM
Calls'em from McLean, Va.

Ask the professor how 0bama's EPA has killed jobs all over the country... farming, energy exploration, manufacturing, etc. It is my understanding that the EPA's impact is in the millions of lost jobs and the billions of dollars.

May. 16 2012 12:19 PM

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