Opinion: I Was Wrong About Obama Endorsing Gay Marriage

Barack Obama's coming out in favor of gay marriage proves once again just how brave I really am.

I'm referring of course to my post on this blog saying that there is no way that Obama would support gay marriage before the election. I wished I had a farm so I could bet it. It's a good thing I don't have a farm.

Coupled with my equally bold prediction that Rick Perry would be the Republican nominee, you might wonder why I make predictions at all. I won't sum up all the ones I got right (Anthony Weiner, ahem) but suffice to say I should stop going out on limbs, and my husband shouldn't let me near the deed to our apartment.

I'm actually impressed that President Obama took this kind of political chance. He has long seemed like the type that never takes political risks — after all, there's a reason Republicans mock his "present" voting record. He actually supported gay marriage back in 1996, but backed away from it in the name of his religious beliefs when he ran for president. Yes, that was the politically expedient maneuver then, and yes, the president conveniently came out with his newly "evolved" belief too late to change anything in North Carolina, which voted just yesterday to prohibit gay marriage. But no one can say this isn't a politically risky move.

What's interesting about Obama's support of gay marriage is that he, like me, supports it on a state-by-state level. Which is odd, because it would be difficult to find another issue where Barack Obama feels the same way — certainly not abortion or healthcare or any major issue of the day.

I've gotten a lot of criticism from liberals for my position over the years, yet they're all cheering Obama for adopting the exact same stance today.

I support gay marriage on a state level because I support nearly everything on a state level (my major exceptions include things like defense or specifically things that state government is not equipped to deal with). Barack Obama became a convenient Federalist today, as if he had gotten so used to hedging on gay marriage that even now he can't stop.