Streams

The Snake Eaters: An Iraqi Success Story

Friday, May 11, 2012

Owen West, a third-generation U.S. Marine, tells the inside story of the American and Iraqi troops who fought the insurgency street by street and house by house in Khalidiya, Iraq. The Snake Eaters gives an account of the mission, one of the success stories of the war in Iraq.

Guests:

Owen West
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Comments [6]

What we need is to not be there.

That, and the criminals that sent young people to Iraq and Afghanistan to kill and be killed to be prosecuted.

May. 11 2012 12:48 PM

Has anyone figured out what the hell we're doing there, in the first place??

May. 11 2012 12:45 PM
VICTOR JUHASZ

Great interview.

As to civil support. It's pretty useless as long as the civilian aides are targets and the locals don't wish to be part of the solution. As I hear it the situation and prognosis is much more dismal in the Stan.

May. 11 2012 12:39 PM
Wayne Johnson Ph.D. from Bk

This discussion begs the question of whether or not we should have been in Afghanistan and Iraq in the first place. Mr. West like the Americans in Vietnam were pawns of LBJ, Bush 2 and Obama. I just returned from a visit to Section 60 at Arlington National where they are digging more and more graves for the boys and girls who are still fighting this insane war.

May. 11 2012 12:38 PM
AL from Manhattan

But does West think the Iraq war was a success/worth the cost? Given that the war killed anywhere from 100,000+ civilians (more than 50% women and children) according to iraqbodycount.com -- and up to 1 million+ (estimated according the 2006 Lancet study endorsed by the science adviser to the UK Prime Minister) as "excess deaths."

May. 11 2012 12:35 PM
LL from UWS

Utterly depressing.

If we're talking about military solutions today, can we talk about humanitarian solutions, too? An aid worker told me that what Afghanistan needs is civil support....

May. 11 2012 12:34 PM

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