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Money Talks. We Translate.

Thursday, April 26, 2012 - 09:20 PM

WNYC

"Money talks, nobody walks," went the old ad for Denison Clothes.

"Money doesn’t talk, it swears," Bob Dylan told us in "It’s Alright Ma."

Well, we’ve got a new spin on that old adage: Money talks -- we translate.

That’s the promise of "Money Talking." I’m Jeff Greenfield, and I’ll be hosting this conversation each week.  It aims to catch you up on the major business and economic news of the day.  But it goes much further. Rather than the latest headline about the deficit fight, we’ll ask: Is a balanced budget desirable, or even possible?  Rather than rehash the latest insider trading case, we ask: Should the government be using its resources to prosecute this at all?  Rather than the latest case of CEO misbehavior, we’ll ask: Just how badly can you behave before you get fired?

What we're looking to do, at root, is to ask -- and answer -- the questions that go to the heart of the matter. Take our first episode: are student loans -- now hitting the $1 trillion mark -- the next bubble? And could that inflict as much damage as the housing meltdown?

We'll do this it with some highly high-profile names in business journalism; folks like Joe Nocera of the New York Times; Rana Foroohar of TIME Magazine. And on this page, I’ll be offering  thoughts on the issues we’ve raised.

[Thought for the week--when Bob Dylan gets his Presidential Medal of Freedom, will he point out that ”even the President of the United States must sometimes have to stand naked?”]

We think we have something new, something different to bring to the business of business and finance. We hope you’ll give a listen.

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