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Mayor Pulls Plug on Waste-to-Energy Site at Fresh Kills

Friday, April 13, 2012

The proposal for a waste to energy site at the site of the old Fresh Kills landfill has been withdrawn after local opposition in Staten Island.

"The mayor listened to the concerns of Staten Island officials about Fresh Kills and decided to remove the site as a possible location," a spokesman for the mayor said. 

The city is still accepting proposals for another waste-to-energy conversion site within the five boroughs or 80 miles of the city. In its request for proposals, the city says it's seeking "only the cleanest and latest waste to energy technologies."

Plants of this kind reduce waste and create energy by burning trash.

A coalition of community groups protested outside the Manhattan offices of the Economic Development Corporation on Monday as city officials met with representatives from companies interested in building a waste-to-energy facility.

Laura Haight, an environmental associate with New York Public Interest Research Group was pleased that the city's decision. "No community should have to be burdened with these dangerous and polluting technologies," she said.

She, however, remains concerned about a specific type of thermal waste to energy incineration that could be one of the proposals considered.

“It's very dangerous, no matter where you put it. Certainly SI has a long legacy of being overburdened with New York's garbage, and there's a very, very, very deep resentment to putting more garbage on Staten Island,” she explained.

Annmarie Fertoli, Kathleen Horan and Denise Blostein contributed reporting.

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