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Christie Tries to Dampen Down VP Speculation

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Gov. Chris Christie (Governor's Office/Tim Larsen)

Now that Mitt Romney has a clear path the Republican nomination for president, focus has begun to shift to who his potential running mate might be. Gov. Chris Christie’s name has been floated often. But the New Jersey governor repeated Wednesday that he has “a job to do here."

Christie said he had not spoken with Romney, but they did email. Christie congratulated Romney, and Romney thanked Christie for his support. But the governor said that was it.

When pressed on the issue, Christie answered in typical Christie fashion. “Yeah, he asked me to be vice president, Max. Yeah, by email. He asked me to be vice president and czar of the world. I mean, come on. No.”

The governor said he will continue to advocate on issues that are important to him.

“But as I've said over and over again, I don't expect to having any greater role in this campaign coming up than I have at the moment,” he said. “I was, I think, Governor Romney's earliest supporter, I'll continue to be his supporter. I'm thrilled that he's going to be the nominee of the party. I told you all along that he's going to be the nominee of the party. He's now going to be the nominee of the party. I look forward to him running a really vigorous campaign against the president this fall, and I hope that he's going to be the 45th president of the United States.”

Sharyn Jackson contributed reporting.

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